Pablo Martinez Monsivais / AP

Senate Judiciary Chairman Chuck Grassley has accelerated his committee's Russia investigation — threatening to subpoena Donald Trump Jr. and former Trump campaign chairman Paul Manafort — leading to both cheers and jeers within the GOP, per Bloomberg.

  • The argument for: Some, like Sen. Lindsey Graham, think Grassley is just doing his job by addressing issues that fall under the purview of his committee, like obstruction of justice and possible campaign finance violations.
  • The argument against: Others feel the Senate Intel Committee's investigation, along with Robert Mueller's probe, are sufficient, especially as Judiciary doesn't have access to classified documents.
  • Grassley on Grassley: "This is what Chuck Grassley does... I think I've got a pretty good reputation for being what I call an equal-opportunity overseer."

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Why it matters: Trump congratulated Georgia Republican Marjorie Taylor Greene, who vocally supports the conspiracy theory, on her victory in a House primary runoff earlier this week — illustrating how the once-fringe conspiracy theory has gained ground within his party.

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Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

U.S. lawmakers are demanding answers from the World Bank about its continued operation of a $50 million loan program in Xinjiang, following Axios reporting on the loans.

Why it matters: The Chinese government is currently waging a campaign of cultural and demographic genocide against ethnic minorities in Xinjiang, in northwest China. The lawmakers contend that the recipients of the loans may be complicit in that repression.