President Trump at the 2016 Republican National Convention. Photo: Bill Clark/Getty Images

The reworked Republican National Convention will be a four-night spectacle including still-under-wraps venues, a 10 p.m. "nightly surprise" and guests and themes playing to "the forgotten men and women of America," two senior Trump campaign officials involved tell Axios.

Driving the news: The messaging will focus heavily on "very granular details" of what a second term for President Trump would look like — answering a question Trump left hanging in a Fox News event earlier this summer — and attack cancel culture, "radical elements" of society and threats to public safety.

Details: Trump is to be formally renominated by delegates in Charlotte, North Carolina, on Monday, Aug. 24.

  • But the aspects that most Americans associate with a convention — big speakers and special events — will be held from 8:30 p.m. to 11 p.m. in and around a "central hub" in another metro area that officials so far have declined to make public.
  • The programming will be a hybrid that mixes in-person and virtual speakers, live and taped appearances. Trump will deliver his acceptance speech live on the fourth and final night of the convention.

What they're saying: "Let the Democrats have their Hollywood A-listers and their political elite class and social elite class," said one of the officials, while the GOP contrasts itself as "the party of real, hardworking Americans."

  • Monday night will focus on America as "a land of heroes."
  • Tuesday: "Land of promise."
  • Wednesday: "Land of opportunity."
  • Thursday: "Land of greatness" and Trump's plan to lead voters to "the great American comeback."

The highest-profile guests will appear between 10-11 p.m. each night during a time slot organizers have set aside for a "nightly surprise factor," when they expect television networks to carry the convention live.

Behind the scenes: Organizers studied the 2012 and 2016 conventions to analyze which speakers made the biggest splashes and how — hoping to create new influencers who can generate breakout coverage through Labor Day and beyond.

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Ina Fried, author of Login
Sep 1, 2020 - Economy & Business

All Raise launches push to help avoid "manels" at tech conferences

Screenshot: AllRaise.org

All Raise, a nonprofit that aims to boost gender diversity in tech and venture capital, is launching a speakers' bureau designed to get more women and non-binary people on stage at technology and business conferences.

Why it matters: All too often, tech conferences are dominated by male speakers and all-male panels — or "manels." By one estimate, only 25% of tech conference speakers are women. And while conferences have shifted online, the gender and race dynamics haven't changed.

Updated 19 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 10 a.m. ET: 32,881,747 — Total deaths: 994,821 — Total recoveries: 22,758,171Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 10 a.m. ET: 7,079,909 — Total deaths: 204,503 — Total recoveries: 2,750,459 — Total tests: 100,492,536Map.
  3. States: New York daily cases top 1,000 for first time since June — U.S. reports over 55,000 new coronavirus cases.
  4. Health: The long-term pain of the mental health pandemicFewer than 10% of Americans have coronavirus antibodies.
  5. Business: Millions start new businesses in time of coronavirus.
  6. Education: Summer college enrollment offers a glimpse of COVID-19's effect.

Durbin on Barrett confirmation: "We can’t stop the outcome"

Senate Minority Whip Dick Durbin (D-Ill.) said on ABC's "This Week" Sunday that Senate Democrats can “slow” the process of confirming Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett “perhaps a matter of hours, maybe days at the most," but that they "can’t stop the outcome."

Why it matters: Durbin confirmed that Democrats have "no procedural silver bullet" to stop Senate Republicans from confirming Barrett before the election, especially with only two GOP senators — Lisa Murkowski of Alaska and Susan Collins of Maine — voicing their opposition. Instead, Democrats will likely look to retaliate after the election if they win control of the Senate and White House.