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Photo: Artur Widak/NurPhoto via Getty Images

Google has agreed to pay more than $3.8 million to settle Labor Department allegations that the search giant discriminated in hiring and pay against women and people of Asian descent.

The big picture: The deal ends the Labor Department case but the broader issues of discrimination at Google and other tech giants are far from settled.

Details: Under the terms of the deal, which the Labor Department announced Monday evening, Google will:

  • hand over $1.3 million in back pay and interest to 2,565 female employees in engineering positions that were subject to pay discrimination;
  • pay more than $1.2 million to 1,757 female and 1,219 Asian applicants who were not hired for software engineering positions; and
  • set up a cash reserve of at least $1.25 million over five years to make pay equity adjustments over the next five years. Any excess money will go toward the company's diversity and inclusion efforts.

Google did not admit fault in the settlement but did agree to improve its systems.

Flashback: Google denied the allegations when the Labor Department first made them in 2017

Between the lines: The settlement comes as Google is under renewed scrutiny for how it treats women and people of color, an issue brought to the forefront with the ouster of prominent Black AI researcher Timnit Gebru.

What they're saying:

  • Google: "We believe everyone should be paid based upon the work they do, not who they are, and invest heavily to make our hiring and compensation processes fair and unbiased."
  • Labor Department regional director Jane Suhr: “The technology industry continues to be one of the region’s largest and fastest growing employers. Regardless of how complex or the size of the workforce, we remain committed to enforcing equal opportunity laws to ensure non-discrimination and equity in the workforce.”

Go deeper: Tech research becomes hazardous ground

Go deeper

Dave Lawler, author of World
33 mins ago - World

Americans increasingly see China as an enemy

One in three Americans, and a majority of Republicans, now view China as an enemy of the United States, according to a new survey from Pew Research Center.

By the numbers: Just 9% of Americans consider China a "partner," while 55% see Beijing as a "competitor" and 34% as an "enemy."

Scoop: Leaked HHS docs spotlight Biden's child migrant dilemma

A group of undocumented immigrants walk toward a Customs and Border Patrol station after being apprehended. Photo: Sergio Flores/The Washington Post via Getty Images

Fresh internal documents from the Department of Health and Human Services show how quickly the number of child migrants crossing the border is overwhelming the administration's stretched resources.

Driving the news: In the week ending March 1, the Border Patrol referred to HHS custody an average of 321 children per day, according to documents obtained by Axios. That's up from a weekly average of 203 in late January and early February — and just 47 per day during the first week of January.

Ben Geman, author of Generate
1 hour ago - Energy & Environment

Mounting emissions data paints bleak picture on Paris climate goals

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

Researchers keep finding new ways to reveal that nations are together showing very few signs of getting on track to meet the Paris Agreement's goals.

One big question: That's whether a spate of recent analyses to that effect, and scientific reports coming later this year, will move the needle on meaningful new policies (not just targets).