Jun 21, 2019

Google gives up on making its own tablets

The Pixel Slate tablet at a 2018 release event Photo: Drew Angerer/Getty Images

After years of trying to make Android tablets a bigger thing, Google will stop making its own slates.

Why it matters: Google's entry into the market failed to make Android-based and Chrome OS-based tablets more significant rivals to Apple's iPad.

Yes, but: The software unit that makes Android will continue to work with companies like Samsung that make their own Android tablets.

Hardware chief Rick Osterloh confirmed the company is scrapping plans for future Google-made tablets, though it will continue to support the Pixel Slate it introduced last year.

  • "Hey, it's true...Google's HARDWARE team will be solely focused on building laptops moving forward, but make no mistake, Android & Chrome OS teams are 100% committed for the long-run on working with our partners on tablets for all segments of the market," Osterloh said in a tweet.

Go deeper: Google debuts new phone, tablet, home hub

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Private equity returns fell behind stocks over the past decade

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

U.S. private equity returns fell just below S&P 500 returns for the 10-year period ending last June, according to a report released Monday morning by Bain & Company.

Why it matters: Private equity markets itself as beating public markets over long-term time horizons, and usually providing an illiquidity premium to boot. These new performance figures not only dent such claims, but provide fresh ammunition to critics of public pension investment in private equity funds.

Why Apple may move to open iOS

Photo illustration: Jakub Porzycki/NurPhoto via Getty Images

Apple may finally allow iPhone owners to set email or browsing apps other than Apple's own as their preferred defaults, according to a Bloomberg report from last week.

The big picture: Customers have long clamored for the ability to choose their preferred apps, and now Apple, like other big tech companies, finds itself under increased scrutiny over anything perceived as anticompetitive.