Photo: Google

Google CEO Sundar Pichai announced Friday that his company is donating more than $800 million in cash and advertising to help stem the spread of the novel coronavirus and ease the impact on small businesses.

Why it matters: It would appear to be the largest donation yet from a tech giant. The ad credits also could help keep business flowing through Google's ad system amid what is expected to be a sharp downturn in advertising.

Details: The donation consists of:

  • $250 million in ad grants to help the World Health Organization (WHO) and more than 100 government agencies around the world provide information about the virus. That's up from $25 million announced last month. Google is also providing $20 million in ad grants to community organizations so they can provide information about relief funds and other resources for small businesses.
  • A $200 million investment fund that will help non-profits and financial institutions provide small businesses with access to capital. That's in addition to $15 million in cash grants already being provided by Google.org. the company's philanthropic arm.
  • $340 million in Google Ads credits available to all small and midsize businesses with active Google accounts over the past year. The credits can be used any time this year.
  • $20 million in Google Cloud credits for academic institutions and researchers to use Google's computing resources on COVID-19 related projects.
  • Financial support and know-how to help ramp up production of personal protective equipment and lifesaving medical devices. Google said it is working with longtime supplier and partner Magid Glove & Safety to produce 2-3 million face masks in the coming weeks that will be donated to the CDC Foundation.

Meanwhile: Apple on Friday announced a new website and app designed to help people easily find accurate information about the virus and determine if they should seek testing.

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Updated 1 hour ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 3 a.m. ET: 32,844,146 — Total deaths: 994,208 — Total recoveries: 22,715,726Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 3 a.m. ET: 7,078,798 — Total deaths: 204,497 — Total recoveries: 2,750,459 — Total tests: 100,492,536Map.
  3. States: New York daily cases top 1,000 for first time since June — U.S. reports over 55,000 new coronavirus cases.
  4. Health: The long-term pain of the mental health pandemicFewer than 10% of Americans have coronavirus antibodies.
  5. Business: Millions start new businesses in time of coronavirus.
  6. Education: Summer college enrollment offers a glimpse of COVID-19's effect.

Graham hopes his panel will approve Amy Coney Barrett by late October

Sen. Lindsey Graham during a Senate Judiciary Committee hearing on Sept. 24, 2020 in Washington, DC. Photo: Win McNamee/Getty Images

Senate Judiciary Committee Chair Lindsey Graham (R-S.C.) told Fox News Saturday he expects confirmation hearings on Judge Amy Coney Barrett's nomination to the Supreme Court to start Oct. 12 and for his panel to approve her by Oct. 26.

Why it matters: That would mean the final confirmation vote could take place on the Senate floor before the Nov. 3 presidential election.

Texas city declares disaster after brain-eating amoeba found in water supply

Characteristics associated with a case of amebic meningoencephalitis due to Naegleria fowleri parasites. Photo: Smith Collection/Gado/Getty Images

Texas authorities have issued a warning amid concerns that the water supply in the southeast of the state may contain the brain-eating amoeba naegleria fowleri following the death of a 6-year-old boy.

Details: The Texas Commission on Environmental Quality issued a "do not use" water alert Friday for eight cities, along with the Clemens and Wayne Scott Texas Department of Criminal Justice corrections centers and the Dow Chemical plant in Freeport. This was later lifted for all places except for Lake Jackson, which issued a disaster declaration Saturday.

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