Oct 19, 2017

Google CEO under pressure to fix Google's problems

Google CEO Sundar Pichai takes to the stage to announce a new initiative called Grow with Google. Photo: Keith Srakocic / AP

"Everyone's Mad at Google and Sundar Pichai Has to Fix It: The CEO is increasingly boxed in by regulators, tech critics on both the right and the left, and even his own employees," Mark Bergen and Brad Stone write on the cover of Bloomberg Businessweek. There's fake news to deal with, the limits of AI to sift out hateful material, Russian use of Google's AdWords, not to mention regulation in Europe.

  • "Pichai has ... recast Google's mission in the most dramatic way since the search engine went live 20 years ago. Inside and outside the company, he's elevated the role and glorified the promise of artificial intelligence — the ability of advanced computers to make independent decisions."

"Those decisions might be as small as when to flag a calendar appointment, or as consequential as how a multibillion-dollar hedge fund might trade."On Russian use of Google's AdWords and YouTube last year: "There's clearly stuff which shouldn't be happening which happened, so we should fix it ... Anytime we make a mistake, it's very public for the world to see."Scott Galloway, a New York University professor and author of The Four, a critical book about big technology companies, says "Google would be the scariest company in the world if you didn't believe they had adult supervision."

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Bernie Sanders wins Nevada caucus

Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Bernie Sanders waves to supporters at a campaign rally on Friday in Las Vegas. Photo: Mario Tama/Getty Images

Sen. Bernie Sanders is projected to handily win the Nevada Democratic primary caucus, becoming the clear frontrunner among 2020 Democratic presidential primary election candidates.

Why it matters: Nevada is the first state with a diverse population to hold a nominating contest, highlighting candidates' abilities to connect with voters of color — particularly Latino voters.

Go deeperArrowUpdated 50 mins ago - Politics & Policy

South Korea and Italy see spikes in coronavirus cases

Data: The Center for Systems Science and Engineering at Johns Hopkins, the CDC, and China's Health Ministry. Note: China numbers are for the mainland only and U.S. numbers include repatriated citizens.

The novel coronavirus has spread to more nations, and the U.S. reports a doubling of its confirmed cases to 34 — while noting these are mostly due to repatriated citizens, emphasizing there's no "community spread" yet in the United States.

The big picture: COVID-19 has now killed at least 2,362 people and infected more than 77,000 others, mostly in mainland China. New countries to announce infections recently include Israel and Lebanon, while Iran reported its sixth death from the virus. South Korea's confirmed cases jumped from 204 Friday to 433 on Saturday and Italy's case count rose from 3 to 62 by Saturday.

Go deeperArrowUpdated 2 hours ago - Health

America's rundown roads add to farmers' struggles

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

American farmers are struggling to safely use the roads that cut through their fields; decades of neglect and lack of funding have made the routes dangerous.

The big picture: President Trump has long promised to invest billions in rural infrastructure, and his latest proposal would allocate $1 trillion for such projects. Rural America, where many of Trump's supporters live, would see a large chunk of that money.