Ina Fried Oct 12
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Google announces $1 billion job training and education program

Google CEO Sundar Pichai announcing the Grow with Google program. Photo: Google

Google CEO Sundar Pichai was in Pittsburgh Wednesday to announce a new five-year, $1 billion program to help close the global education gap. Part of the program was a new "Grow with Google" program to work with U.S. cities as well as a $10 million grant to Goodwill that will see Google employees working with the nonprofit to train people in digital skills.

Why it matters: Google, along with Apple, Microsoft and other big tech companies, have all launched significant efforts in recent months to demonstrate their commitment to education and U.S. jobs.

Here are the key components of Google's effort:

  • The U.S. Grow with Google initiative will allow communities to access trainings and other resources from Google. A multi-city tour to kick off the effort will start Nov. 10 in Indianapolis.
  • The partnership with Goodwill aims to have 1,000 Google employees training 1.2 million people in digital skills and job opportunities over the next three years.
  • The global effort will provide $1 billion in grants to nonprofits around the world. Google is pledging 1 million employee volunteer hours as well.

Other companies: Microsoft last week announced its TechSpark effort to work with a variety of rural communities and smaller cities to expand their tech job potential. Apple has been touting the number of U.S. jobs it has created and also launched a $1 billion fund designed to spur more advanced manufacturing here.

Mike Allen 9 hours ago
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A White House olive branch: no plan to fire Mueller

Photo: Jim Watson / AFP / Getty Images

After a weekend at war with the Mueller investigation, the White House is extending an olive branch. Ty Cobb, the White House lawyer handling the probe, plans to issue this statement:

“In response to media speculation and related questions being posed to the Administration, the White House yet again confirms that the President is not considering or discussing the firing of the Special Counsel, Robert Mueller.”

Why it matters: The White House strategy had been to cooperate with Mueller. So this is an effort to turn down the temperature after a weekend of increasingly personal provocations aimed at the special counsel.

Jonathan Swan 11 hours ago
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Trump's trade plan that would blow up the WTO

President Trump announces tariffs on steel and aluminum earlier this month, flanked by Steven Mnuchin, Wilbur Ross, Robert Lighthizer, and Peter Navarro. Photo: Chip Somodevilla / Getty Images

For months, President Donald Trump has been badgering his economic advisors to give him broad, unilateral authority to raise tariffs — a move that would all but break the World Trade Organization.

His favorite word: “reciprocal.” He’s always complaining to staff about the fact that the U.S. has much lower tariffs on some foreign goods than other countries have on the same American-made goods. The key example is cars: The European Union has a 10 percent tariff on all cars, including those manufactured in America, and China hits all foreign-made cars with 25 percent tariffs. But the U.S. only charges 2.5 percent for foreign cars we import.