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Photo: Michael Kovac/Getty Images

Goldman Sachs CEO David Solomon is preparing for more stock market volatility, particularly in the near term, and currently sees some "excess in markets," he told Axios in a phone call this week.

Why it matters: Solomon is the latest in a long list of high-profile CEOs, fund managers and investment strategists to warn that stock prices may be running away from reality.

What he's saying: "The markets have been quite ebullient as of late. You know, I think there's some excess in markets."

  • "I think there's a lot of retail participation in markets that's certainly making markets a little bit more ebullient. I'd be cautious about some of that."

Driving the news: U.S. equity indexes bounced back strongly from Monday's selloff and are again trading near all-time highs, despite coronavirus cases and deaths in the U.S. and around the world rising to new record highs.

By the numbers: Analysts at Bank of America Research noted Tuesday that S&P 500 earnings are estimated to have fallen by 15% but the index finished 2020 up 18.4% and set 33 record highs during the year.

  • Stocks have risen 56% in two years.

The big picture: "I do think the recovery just won't be a straight line, and you know, I think the markets are pricing in, you know, just everything working perfectly as we come out of this, and I'm sure there'll be bumps along the way."

Subscribe to Axios AM/PM for a daily rundown of what's new and why it matters, directly from Mike Allen.
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Go deeper

Robinhood has a stacked policy team — and it's going to need it

Photo Illustration: Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

The stock-trading app Robinhood has an arsenal of political power brokers it can deploy on its behalf as it faces congressional inquiries over its role in an internet-fueled market manipulation frenzy.

Why it matters: The populist, discount trading platform is going to need that firepower because its decision to suspend trading of stock in GameStop and a number of other companies on Thursday has sparked criticism and promised inquiries from both sides of the aisle.

Updated 25 mins ago - Axios Twin Cities

In photos: Twin Cities on edge after Daunte Wright shooting

Police officers form a line as they face off with demonstrators protesting the death of Daunte Wright outside the Brooklyn Center police station on April 12 in Brooklyn Center, Minnesota. Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images

There were tense scenes in the Twin Cities suburb of Brooklyn Center Monday night, after demonstrators defied a 7 p.m. curfew to protest for a second night the fatal police shooting of Daunte Wright.

The big picture: The curfew was announced following a night of protests and unrest over the killing of Wright, 20, during a traffic stop Sunday. Following peaceful protests and a daytime vigil, police again deployed tear gas during clashes with protesters Monday night, according to reporters on the scene.

Japan to release Fukushima water into sea

People near storage tanks for radioactive water at the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant in Okuma, Fukushima Prefecture, Japan, in 2020. Photo: Tomohiro Ohsumi/Getty Images

Japan's government on Tuesday announced plans to release more than 1 million metric tons of contaminated water from the destroyed Fukushima nuclear plant into the Pacific Ocean following a treatment process.

Why it matters: While the Biden administration has said Japan appears to have met globally accepted nuclear safety standards, officials in South Korea, China and Taiwan, local residents, those in the fishing industry and green groups oppose the plans, due to begin in about two years, per the Guardian.