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Mark Zuckerberg. Photo: Josh Edelson/AFP/Getty Images.

Facebook rolled out its new dating vertical, called Facebook Dating, in Colombia on Thursday.

Why it matters: Its potential is huge — Facebook says 200 million users identify as single on their profiles, per Recode.

The details:

  • CEO Mark Zuckerberg wants the dating service to be for meaningful relationships, not hookups, and a majority of Facebook users polled said they would be interested in such a service.
  • The system is centered around an algorithm-powered home screen of suggested romantic matches based on everything Facebook knows about users that other apps don’t, per TechCrunch.
  • Users 18 and older will be able to create dating profiles and, once those reach a critical mass, find some matches, according to Wired.
  • There won’t be any swiping to match with profiles, unlike Tinder and Bumble.
  • The service doesn’t require downloading an additional application to your phone.
  • Facebook restricts potential matches to people located less than 100 kilometers (62 miles) away.
  • The company plans to expand the service to other countries, including the U.S., in the future.

Yes, but privacy concerns still loom over Facebook following the Cambridge Analytica scandal, and the company will need to manipulate its data to run this service.

The bottom line: Facebook's service is currently free, but there is a potential market for subscriptions. Tinder, a subscription-based dating app that launched in 2012, will make more than $800 million in revenue in 2018, per Recode.

Go deeper

Facebook to lift political ad ban imposed after November election

Photo Illustration by Omar Marques/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images

Facebook will finally allow advertisers to resume running political and social issue ads in the U.S. on Thursday, according to a company update.

The big picture: Facebook and rival Google instituted political ad bans to slow the spread of misinformation and curb confusion around the presidential election and its aftermath.

Bryan Walsh, author of Future
25 mins ago - Technology

AI is industrializing

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

Artificial intelligence is becoming a true industry, with all the pluses and minuses that entails, according to a sweeping new report.

Why it matters: AI is now in nearly every area of business, with the pandemic pushing even more investment in drug design and medicine. But as the technology matures, challenges around ethics and diversity grow.

Updated 1 hour ago - Politics & Policy

National Guard chief: Pentagon's "unusual" Jan. 6 restrictions led to 3-hour delay

William Walker, commanding general of the D.C. National Guard, testified Wednesday that a three-hour delay in approval for National Guard assistance during the Jan. 6 Capitol attack was exacerbated by "unusual" restrictions on his authorities by Pentagon leadership.

Why it matters: Walker testified that if Army Secretary Ryan McCarthy had not prohibited him in a Jan. 5 memo from using the National Guard's "Quick Reaction Force" without authorization, he would have "immediately" sent troops to the Capitol after receiving a "frantic call" from then-Capitol Police Chief Steven Sund.