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The Al -Noor Mosque in Christchurch, New Zealand on Sept. 13. Photo: Tessa Burrows/Getty Images

Hundreds of clergy and worshippers of various faiths were killed at temples, synagogues, churches and mosques around the world this year, AP reports.

The big picture: The Christchurch mosque attacker killed 51 people and the event led to international calls to action against online extremism and terrorism fueled by white supremacist ideology. But other attacks gained sparse international attention, like a deadly Dec. 1 shooting at a Protestant church in the West African country Burkina Faso.

  • In January in the Philippines, two suicide bombers killed 23 people and wounded about 100 during Mass in a Roman Catholic cathedral on a predominately Muslim island, per AP.
  • More than 100 people at Catholic churches and a Protestant church were killed on Easter Sunday in Sri Lanka by local militants, AP reports.
  • A shooter who targeted a California synagogue soon after Easter told a 911 dispatcher that "he had just shot up a synagogue to save white people from Jews," per AP.
  • In October, more than 60 people were killed during Friday prayers when a village mosque in eastern Afghanistan was bombed, AP reports. No group claimed responsibility for the attack.
  • A shooter tried and failed to break into a synagogue in Halle, Germany during Yom Kippur services in October, per AP. When the gunman was unable to get inside the packed service, he shot people in nearby streets, killing two and injuring two others.

Flashback: Last year, a lethal shooting at the Tree of Life Synagogue in Pittsburgh likely marked the deadliest attack on Jewish people in the U.S., according to the Anti-Defamation League.

Go deeper: What the deadliest mass shootings have in common

Go deeper

Biden plans to ask public to wear masks for first 100 days in office

Joe Biden. Photo: Mark Makela/Gettu Images

President-elect Joe Biden and Vice President-elect Kamala Harris sat down with CNN on Thursday for their first joint interview since the election.

The big picture: In the hour-long segment, the twosome laid out plans for responding to the pandemic, jump-starting the economy and managing the transition of power, among other priorities.

The quick FCC fix that would get more students online

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

As the pandemic forces students out of school, broadband deployment programs aren't going to move fast enough to help families in immediate need of better internet access. But Democrats at the Federal Communications Commission say the incoming Biden administration could put a dent in that digital divide with one fast policy change.

State of play: An existing FCC program known as E-rate provides up to $4 billion for broadband at schools, but Republican FCC chairman Ajit Pai has resisted modifying the program during the pandemic to provide help connecting students at home.

Dion Rabouin, author of Markets
14 mins ago - Politics & Policy

America's hidden depression

Biden introduces his pick for Treasury secretary, Janet Yellen, on Dec. 1. Photo: Alex Wong/Getty Images

President-elect Biden faces a fragile recovery that could easily fall apart, as the economy remains in worse shape than most people think.

Why it matters: There is a recovery happening. But it's helping some people immensely and others not at all. And it's that second part that poses a massive risk to the Biden-Harris administration's chance of success.