Photo: EVARISTO SA/AFP via Getty Images.

The Intercept reported Thursday that a Brazilian judge has declined to move forward with cybercrime charges against its co-founder Glenn Greenwald.

The backdrop: Brazilian prosecutors last month charged Greenwald — best known for publishing leaked documents from whistleblower Edward Snowden about U.S. domestic surveillance — for allegedly spreading cellphone messages that undermined the reputation of a sweeping anti-corruption investigation known as Operation Car Wash.

  • Far-right President Jair Bolsonaro has repeatedly attacked The Intercept and Greenwald personally for their investigative reporting. Greenwald lives in Brazil and is married to Brazilian politician David Miranda, who lost a bid for a Brazilian congressional seat and has labeled himself the "antithesis of Bolsonaro."
  • The Intercept notes that while the judge opted to not further pursue charges, it was "only on account of a previous finding by the Brazilian Supreme Court that The Intercept’s reporting on Operation Car Wash had not transgressed any legal boundaries."

What they're saying: "While I welcome the fact that this investigation will not move forward, this decision is insufficient to guarantee the rights of a free press," Greenwald said in a statement.

  • "The rejection is based on the fact that the supreme court already issued an injunction against attempts of official persecution against me. This is not enough," Greenwald continued.
  • "We seek a decisive rejection from the Supreme Court of this abusive prosecution on the grounds that it is a clear and grave assault on core press freedoms. Anything less would leave open the possibility of further erosion of the fundamental freedom of the press against other journalists."

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