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Vice President-elect Kamala Harris campaigns today in Savannah, Ga., with Senate candidates Raphael Warnock and Jon Ossoff. Photo: Mike Segar/Reuters 

Attention is turning to Tuesday's twin runoffs in Georgia to decide control of the U.S. Senate.

  • These are three things to watch, from a conversation I had with Patricia Murphy of the Atlanta Journal-Constitution, who's covering the race...
  1. Republicans don't trust the election, potentially dampening turnout. Not one Republican voter Murphy has spoken to since Election Day believes that President-elect Biden won. "Not one, not a person," she said. "And many of them don't even think he'll be inaugurated on January 20."
  2. Tying Raphael Warnock and Jon Ossoff together has been effective for the two Democrats — they even share a Warnock-Ossoff campaign sign. The pairing gives Warnock a boost from the younger voters expected to come out for Ossoff, and gives Ossoff the benefit of the African American voters who are expected to come out for Warnock.
  3. Keep your eyes on Gwinnett County in suburban Atlanta— the former Newt Gingrich territory that's now a stronghold for Democrats. "These are the suburban districts where you can just feel the movement of the ground under your feet,” Murphy said as she drove through the county. "Eight years ago, it could not be more Republican." Today, signs for Warnock and Black Lives Matter dot the area.

Go deeper

Avril Haines confirmed as director of national intelligence

Haines. Photo: Joe Raedle/Getty Image

Avril Haines was quickly confirmed by the Senate on Wednesday as the director of national intelligence (DNI) in a vote of 84-10.

Why it matters: Haines is the first of President Biden's nominees to receive a full Senate confirmation and she will be the first woman to serve as DNI. She's previously served as CIA deputy director from 2013 to 2015 and deputy national security adviser from 2015 to 2017.

Stark reminder for America's corporate leaders

Rosalind "Roz" Brewer is about to become only the second Black woman to permanently lead a Fortune 500 company. She starts as Walgreens CEO on March 15.

Why it matters: It's a stark reminder of how far corporate America's top decision-makers have to go during an unprecedented push by politicians, employees and even a stock exchange to diversify their top ranks.

Ina Fried, author of Login
Updated 1 hour ago - Technology

Apple's quarterly sales top $100 billion for first time

Credit: Apple

Spurred by strong sales of the latest iPhones, Apple reported it took in a record $111 billion in revenue for the three months ended Dec. 31, as the company crushed expectations.

Why it matters: The move showed even a pandemic didn't dull demand for Apple's latest smartphones.