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Gabriel Sterling speaks to the media on Nov. 5 in Atlanta, Georgia. Photo: Megan Varner/Getty Images

Gabriel Sterling, Georgia's voting implementation manager, urged voters on Monday to participate in the state's high-stakes Senate runoff elections as President Trump continues to push unsubstantiated voter fraud claims that some Republicans fear will suppress turnout in the state.

Driving the news: Trump pressed Georgia's Republican secretary of state, Brad Raffensperger, this weekend to "find 11,780 votes" — enough to overturn President-elect Joe Biden's win in the state. Trump argued that "a lot of people aren't going out to vote" in the runoffs, and "a lot of Republicans are going to vote negative, because they hate what you did to the president."

What he's saying: "If you're a Georgia voter, if you want your values reflected by your elected officials, I strongly beg and encourage you, go vote tomorrow. Do not let anybody discourage you. Do not self-suppress your own vote," Sterling said in a press conference that was largely focused on debunking many of the false claims pushed by Trump.

  • "Don't let anybody steal your vote that way. And that's what's happening. If you self-suppress, you're taking away your important voice from this election."
  • "We have certified this election, so there are no more votes to find."

Worth noting: Earlier on Monday, Raffensperger said that an Atlanta-area district attorney's office could investigate the Saturday phone call during which Trump suggested that the secretary of state could face legal trouble if he did not take action on his grievances and unsubstantiated claims of voter fraud.

  • Raffensperger specified that his own office is not likely to investigate the matter.

Go deeper

Off the Rails

Episode 7: Trump turns on Pence

Photo illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios. Photos: Elijah Nouvelage, Alex Wong/Getty Images

Beginning on election night 2020 and continuing through his final days in office, Donald Trump unraveled and dragged America with him, to the point that his followers sacked the U.S. Capitol with two weeks left in his term. Axios takes you inside the collapse of a president with a special series.

Episode 7: Trump turns on Pence. Trump believes the vice president can solve all his problems by simply refusing to certify the Electoral College results. It's a simple test of loyalty: Trump or the U.S. Constitution.

"The end is coming, Donald."

The male voice in the TV ad boomed through the White House residence during "Fox & Friends" commercial breaks. Over and over and over. "The end is coming, Donald. ... On Jan. 6, Mike Pence will put the nail in your political coffin."

Off the Rails

Episode 2: Barbarians at the Oval

Photo illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios. Photo: Jim Watson/AFP/Getty Images

Beginning on election night 2020 and continuing through his final days in office, Donald Trump unraveled and dragged America with him, to the point that his followers sacked the U.S. Capitol with two weeks left in his term. This Axios series takes you inside the collapse of a president.

Episode 2: Trump stops buying what his professional staff are telling him, and increasingly turns to radical voices telling him what he wants to hear. Read episode 1.

President Trump plunked down in an armchair in the White House residence, still dressed from his golf game — navy fleece, black pants, white MAGA cap. It was Saturday, Nov. 7. The networks had just called the election for Joe Biden.

Off the Rails

Episode 1: A premeditated lie lit the fire

Photo illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios. Photo: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Beginning on election night 2020 and continuing through his final days in office, Donald Trump unraveled and dragged America with him, to the point that his followers sacked the U.S. Capitol with two weeks left in his term. This Axios series takes you inside the collapse of a president.

Episode 1: Trump’s refusal to believe the election results was premeditated. He had heard about the “red mirage” — the likelihood that early vote counts would tip more Republican than the final tallies — and he decided to exploit it.

"Jared, you call the Murdochs! Jason, you call Sammon and Hemmer!”