Police spray protesters with pepper spray during a demonstration outside the Third Police Precinct on Wednesday in Minneapolis, Minnesota. Photo: Kerem Yucel/AFP via Getty Images

The Minnesota Department of Human Rights (MDHR) announced an investigation on Tuesday into the conduct of the Minneapolis Police Department over the past decade, alongside a civil rights charge into the killing of George Floyd.

The big picture: Complaints of excessive force brought against the city's law enforcement officers "have become commonplace, especially by African-American residents," the New York Times reports.

  • The investigation is intended to determine "if the MPD has engaged in systemic discriminatory practices towards people of color and ensure any such practices are stopped," Tuesday's statement reads.

Driving the news: Derek Chauvin, the Minneapolis police officer who knelt on Floyd's neck prior to his death, was charged with third-degree murder and manslaughter last week.

What they're saying: Minneapolis Police Chief Medaria Arradondo responded to Floyd's brother on CNN Sunday evening in the family's first exchange with the police department.

  • "Being silent, or not intervening, to me, you're complicit. So I don't see a level of distinction any different," Arradondo said, when asked if he plans to arrest all officers involved in Floyd's death. "Mr. Floyd died in our hands, and so I see that as being complicit." Arradondo noted charges would come through the county attorney office.
  • “George Floyd should be alive. He deserved to live a life full of dignity and joy,” MDHR Commissioner Rebecca Lucero said in a statement. “Community leaders have been asking for structural change for decades. They have fought for this and it is essential that we acknowledge the work and commitment of those who have paved the path to make today’s announcement possible.”
  • “Minnesotans can expect our administration to use every tool at our disposal to deconstruct generations of systemic racism in our state,” Minnesota Gov. Tim Walz said in a statement.

Go deeper... Minneapolis police chief to George Floyd's brother: "Mr. Floyd died in our hands"

Go deeper

Pew poll: Americans support allowing citizens to sue officers for misconduct

A police officer arresting a demonstrator in Portland, Oregon, on July 4. Photo: John Rudoff/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images

66% of Americans support repealing qualified immunity for police officers and allowing civilians to sue officers for misconduct and excessive use of force, even if it makes law enforcement’s jobs more difficult, according to a Pew Research Center survey released Thursday.

Why it matters: Qualified immunity shields government officials from liability. When applied to police officers, it makes successful prosecution of misconduct difficult. Black Lives Matters is calling for an end to qualified immunity for police, and the practice has been at the center of debate on police reform.

Updated 1 hour ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 12 p.m. ET: 12,772,755 — Total deaths: 566,036 — Total recoveries — 7,030,749Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 12 p.m. ET: 3,269,531 — Total deaths: 134,898 — Total recoveries: 995,576 — Total tested: 39,553,395Map.
  3. Politics: Trump wears face mask in public for first time.
  4. States: Florida smashes single-day record for new coronavirus cases with over 15,000.
  5. Public health: Trump's coronavirus testing czar says lockdowns in hotspots "should be on the table" — We're losing the war on the coronavirus.
  6. Education: Betsy DeVos says schools that don't reopen shouldn't get federal funds — Pelosi accuses Trump of "messing with the health of our children."
2 hours ago - Health

Florida smashes single-day record for new coronavirus cases

Data: Covid Tracking Project; Chart: Axios Visuals

Florida reported 15,299 confirmed coronavirus cases on Sunday — a new single-day record for any state, according to its health department.

The big picture: The figure shatters both Florida's previous record of 11,458 new cases and the single-state record of 11,694 set by California last week, according to AP. It also surpasses New York's daily peak of 11,571 new cases in April, and comes just a day after Disney World reopened in Orlando.