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Good morning and welcome back to Generate. In a moment, we'll spend some time talking about Americans and Paris, but first, let's look at some Americans in Boston.

Yesterday's Boston Marathon was 41-year-old former champ Meb Keflezghi's curtain call, and it happened with tons of class (as always). Jordan Hasay has found her distance, taking third and running the fastest 26.2 mile debut ever by an American woman, and Galen Rupp took second in the men's race despite a rocky buildup. Non-energy thought bubble: After three marathons in steamy conditions (and those hills in Boston), your Generate host really wants to see how fast Rupp can go on a fast course in cool weather, like Berlin next fall.

Ok, thanks for indulging all that, let's dive in . . .

‘Remain’ camp looks ascendant in Paris climate battle

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Senior Trump administration officials will huddle at the White House today about whether to remain in the Paris climate accord, and under what terms. A decision is expected by late May.

Likely outcome: Several industry sources tell Axios that they expect the "remain" camp to prevail in the divided administration.

  • The U.S. would remain a part of the pact but weaken or jettison the Obama-era carbon cutting pledge in the non-binding accord, something effectively already underway anyway as EPA and other agencies unwind Obama policies.
We've got much more on that in the Axios stream. Click here for the full story.

More Paris: In case you missed it, my Axios colleague Amy Harder's debut column yesterday provided a good look at why various sectors of corporate America are in favor of remaining in the Paris deal.

Another voice: The big liquefied natural gas exporting company Cheniere Energy is the latest major energy interest to urge the Trump administration to stay in the Paris deal, making the case that it's good business. Check out their letter to the White House here.

Tech notes

The next grid, part 1: The Rocky Mountain Institute's blog explores the potential for transforming the power grid into a "platform-based" business model, joining other industries that have "reoriented from one-directional pipeline delivery systems to multisided platforms on which information and services flow in many directions between actors."

  • Questions abound, like which entities should run such a model; how the revenues would work; and, what products and services would be transacted over these "distribution system operator" concepts.
  • But there's a lot happening already in states including New York, California, and Illinois. For instance, ConEdison is implementing a "virtual power plant" for 300 homes in New York City and is testing new approaches to aggregate energy resources like solar and storage.

The next grid, part 2: My colleague Shannon Vavra wrote about the battery-gas turbine hybrid system that GE and Southern California Edison cut the ribbon on yesterday.

It's a model that can help smooth the integration of growing amounts of renewable power into the state's electricity system.

Battery rebels: Greentech Media takes a look at alternative battery tech companies trying to compete at a time of lower-than-expected costs for producers of more established lithium-ion products.

  • "These low-cost lithium-ion batteries are spawning major growth in electric cars and batteries for buildings and the power grid. But they are wreaking havoc on the businesses of those that placed bets on the other side of lithium-ion price drop."
  • Some specific companies that make alternatives to lithium-ion, like Eos Energy Storage and Ambri, are pushing forward.

​Hydrocarbon deals

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Permian play: The Blackstone Group is buying EagleClaw Midstream Ventures, which operates natural gas pipelines and processing facilities in the Permian Basin, in a deal worth around $2 billion.

  • The private equity group's investment is the latest in a flurry of industry dealmaking in the Texas region.
  • Oil production is surging in the Permian, and Bloomberg's piece on the natural gas deal points out: "While most producers are targeting oil, it often comes mixed with substantial natural gas."

Petrochemicals: Via Reuters: Williams Partners said yesterday it would sell its stake in a unit that owns 88.46 percent of an olefins plant in Louisiana to Nova Chemicals for $2.1 billion in cash, as part of its efforts to focus on natural gas.

From Amy's notebook: Keystone opinions in Obama-world

My Axios colleague Amy Harder passes along this slice of Beltway life . . .

Adam Sieminski, who was administrator of the Energy Department's Energy Information Administration under President Obama, says with a laugh that now he's left the government, he can have an opinion again.

"One opinion I don't have to stifle anymore is that I think the Keystone XL pipeline should have been built," Sieminski told Axios on the sidelines of a Brookings Institution confab Monday of some of Washington's biggest names in energy. He went on to say that pipelines are a safer way to transport oil than rail.

Why it matters now: With Republicans in control of the White House and both chambers of Congress, some Democrats might find it more politically possible to take positions that go counter to certain liberal causes, such as opposing fossil-fuel infrastructure like Keystone, which could lead to more bipartisan energy policy.

Our thought bubble: During the seven-year Keystone XL saga (which ultimately led Obama to reject it in November 2015), many Obama administration officials privately said the fight was a distraction and the pipeline should be approved. In the end though, symbolic climate politics won out over pragmatic energy policy.

Lightning round

Influence: Liquefied natural gas pioneer Charif Souki's firm Tellurian Inc., which formed last year, has tapped Alignment Government Strategies as its first outside lobbyists, a newly posted filing shows.

Polls: The Pew Research Center's latest poll includes a look at how U.S. residents view the two main parties on the environment. Fifty-nine percent see Democrats better equipped to deal with the environment, while 28 percent give the nod to Republicans.

Saudi Arabia: The kingdom aims to produce 10 percent of its power from renewables in the next 10 years "as it pushes ahead with a multi-billion-dollar plan to diversify its energy mix and free up more crude oil for export," Reuters reports.

EPA: Via The Detroit News, the agency is pushing back against a report by a Chicago Sun-Times columnist that it may shutter its Region 5 office, which covers the upper midwest and Great Lakes region.

Cars: A new survey suggests that Americans' interest in electric vehicles has remained steady over the past five years even as gasoline prices have fallen, Fortune reports.

  • "The AAA consumer survey released Tuesday found that 15% of Americans are likely to buy an electric vehicle as their next car — close to the percentage of consumers who plan to buy a pickup truck instead."

Thanks for reading! We'll see you later today in the Axios stream and back here tomorrow morning. And please keep the tips and feedback coming to ben@axios.com.

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Questions swirling around Corey Lewandowski

Evan Vucci / AP

A hot topic of conversation the past 48 hours among sources close to President Trump: Corey Lewandowski's decision not to register as a lobbyist. Lewandowski, who runs a political consulting firm that advertises its proximity to the White House, talks to the president regularly, including visits to the West Wing. But he insists he's doing no lobbying for his clients, whatsoever.

This situation is fast developing into a major PR problem for Trump's former campaign manager. I'm told multiple media outlets, including the New York Times, are investigating Lewandowski's firm. Politico's Ken Vogel and Josh Dawsey published a deeply-reported story a couple of days ago that says a second firm Lewandowski co-founded appears to have offered access to the President.

The key paragraph:

A document provided to an Eastern European politician by an international consulting firm that Lewandowski co-founded this year promises to arrange "meetings with well-established figures," including Trump, Pence, "key members of the U.S. Administration" and outside Trump allies. [Barry] Bennett...[Lewandowski's business partner]... said that he hadn't seen the Washington East West Political Strategies document. He acknowledged, though, that he and Lewandowski started the firm.

I asked Lewandowski on Sunday about his decision not to register as a lobbyist. He wouldn't explain himself, but instead kept telling me to contact his clients. Lewandowski then sent me a statement from his firm's lawyer John Mino, which said the firm and its employees "take their compliance obligation seriously," and are fully compliant with lobbying disclosure laws.

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Startup Bridj shuts down after deal with car company falls through

Bridj, a start-up that called itself the "first pop-up mass transit system" is shutting down after a hoped-for deal with a major car company fell through.

The company, which operated in Boston and Kansas City, sought to offer various regional shuttles, using data to determine where vehicles should be placed. In a post on its Web site, the 50-person company was ceasing operations after three years:

We made the strategic choice to pursue a deal with a major car company who promised a close date for a sizable transaction in lieu of a traditional venture capital funding round. The close date timeline extended from weeks to months, as they sought to gain the appropriate internal approvals that we (and they) thought were already in place. Throughout, we remained convinced of the close strategic fit and both sides had every expectation that the transaction would close. Despite assurances, and all parties acting in the best of faith, that didn't happen.
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New York Times plays nice with Trump

Mark Lennihan / AP

President Trump got a 100-day gift on Sunday from the paper he had called "totally failing" at a rally the night before: The New York Times' Sunday Review began a campaign to get readers to "Say Something Nice About Donald Trump," and a cover story of the section respectfully channeled the Steve Bannon world view.
What's going on here: Neither of the pieces appeared to be sarcastic. Both appear to be part of the paper's effort to be more relevant in the Trump era.

Bret Stephens, a conservative columnist hired from the Wall Street Journal, debuted in Saturday's paper, calling for more balance in the climate-change debate.

At the time Stephens was hired, James Bennet, the paper's editorial page editor, told the Huffington Post's Michael Calderone it was an effort to "further widen" the range of views the paper presents to readers.
In Sunday's paper:
  • Michael Kinsley, the leading liberal, wrote an opinion piece, "The Upside to the Presidential Twitter Feed," praising Trump for composing tweets himself, and making "social media almost a part of our constitutional system": "[T]he average citizen now has a view straight into the president's id."
  • But the surprising part was the last graf: "So that's one good thing he has done for the country. Can you think of another? Please let me know at somethingnice@nytimes.com. We'll be revisiting this theme regularly in Sunday Review."
  • On the section's cover, in a piece called "The New Party of 'America First,'" theologian R.R. Reno, editor of the journal First Things, writes: "Mr. Trump's shocking success at the polls has done our country a service. Scholars may tut-tut about the historical connotations of 'America First,' but the basic sentiment needs to be endorsed. Our country has dissolved to a far greater degree than those cloistered on the coasts allow themselves to realize."

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Pence admits Trump tax plan could bleed red ink

Andrew Harnik / AP

Vice President Pence said plainly on NBC's "Meet the Press" what has long been whispered at both ends of Pennsylvania Avenue: The White House is fine with a tax cut that raises the deficit.

Pence: "[T]he early response [to the tax plan] on Capitol Hill has been very encouraging."

Moderator Chuck Todd: "I understand people are happy about it, but you are gonna increase the deficit."

Pence: "Well, maybe in the short term. But the truth is if we don't get this economy growing at three percent... we're never gonna meet the obligations that we've made today."

Why it matters: The administration's willingness to allow deficit spending to fund a tax cut makes it less likely that Speaker Paul Ryan will get his border adjustment tax. It could raise $1 trillion over a decade, but would do so in a way — making imported consumer goods more expensive — that's too painful for many key Republicans to stomach.
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White House: China ‘starting to do something’ on North Korea

Susan Walsh / AP

National Security Adviser H.R. McMaster praised China on Sunday for steps toward confronting North Korea — including public statements, messages in the Chinese press, and a "more strident and stringent enforcement of existing U.N. sanctions."
"Yes, we do see China starting to do something," McMaster told Chris Wallace on Fox News Sunday.
"But it is clear, more needs to be done. We are going to ask China to do more as we do more, as [well as] our South Korean and Japanese allies."
McMaster said the U.S. could not "tolerate" the risks from a North Korean nuclear buildup, and he accompanied his diplomatic stance with a renewed threat, saying Trump would solve the issue "one war or another."
Between the lines: For the U.S. audience, McMaster is giving Trump a pat on the back for successfully recalibrating his rhetoric on China. For the international audience, McMaster is prodding Beijing to amp up efforts to further isolate North Korea.
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Globalization and French lace

Emilio Morenatti / AP

An excellent Sunday New York Times piece traces the path of globalization using French lace:
  • Calais became a major center of lace production in the early 19th century. As of the 1960s, 30,000 people worked in lace factories there, at which point technological improvements meant fewer workers were needed.
  • Soon after, demand began to drop and factories opened in Asia in which 15 employees cost the same as one in Calais.
  • In 2005, the E.U. ended textile import quotas — the "final blow" for French lace as Asian lace flooded the market.
  • Today: Fewer than 300 people work in the remaining lace factories in Calais, which "rely more on machinery than manpower."
Why it matters: Globalization and mechanization have cost millions of manufacturing jobs from Calais to Cleveland, and it's affecting politics. Calais used to be a left-wing stronghold — now it's expected to go for far-right nationalist Marine Le Pen in the May 8 presidential runoff.

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Trump: Kim Jong-un is a "smart cookie"

KRT via AP Video

President Trump's response when asked what he thinks of the North Korean dictator by CBS' John Dickerson:

"I really, you know, have no comment on him. People are saying, 'Is he sane?' I have no idea. I can tell you this, and a lot of people don't like when I say it, but he was a young man of 26 or 27 when he took over from his father, when his father died. He's dealing with obviously very tough people, in particular the generals and others. And at a very young age, he was able to assume power. A lot of people, I'm sure, tried to take that power away, whether it was his uncle or anybody else. And he was able to do it. So obviously, he's a pretty smart cookie."

The trend: Trump respects people, even dictators, that are able to obtain and consolidate power. He has, for example, congratulated President Erdogan of Turkey for gaining sweeping new powers in a controversial referendum, and expressed admiration for the control Vladimir Putin has over Russia.


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Trump says health care bill will cover pre-existing conditions "beautifully"

Patrick Semansky / AP

President Trump set a high bar for the Republican health care bill this morning, claiming on Face the Nation that the bill has "evolved" and will cover pre-existing conditions "beautifully" even as it gives more leeway to the states.

Reality check: Trump appeared to be referring to the fact that the latest amendment to the bill preserves the federal rule requiring insurers to cover pre-existing conditions. That's true, but what it doesn't preserve is the federal rule banning insurers from charging higher premiums to sick people — states could get waivers from that under certain conditions. That's why liberal health care analysts say the coverage could become unaffordable for people with health problems.

Trump's response: "Forget about unaffordable. What's unaffordable is Obamacare." He also acknowledged that the bill would rely partly on separate high-risk pools in the states that get the waivers: "Pools are going to take care of the pre-existing."

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Woodward and Bernstein on how to cover Trump

Cliff Owen / AP

Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein performed a rare duet last night as they presented awards at the White House Correspondents' Association Dinner, and they offered reflections and advice on covering the presidency.

Bernstein:

  • "Shortly after Richard Nixon resigned the presidency, Bob and I were asked a long question about reporting. We answered with a short phrase that we've used many times since to describe our reporting on Watergate and its purpose and methodology. We called it: 'The best obtainable version of the truth.'"
  • "Richard Nixon tried to make the conduct of the press the issue in Watergate instead of the conduct of the President and his men. We tried to avoid the noise and let the reporting speak."
  • "Almost inevitably, unreasonable government secrecy is the enemy — and usually the giveaway about what the real story might be. [Applause] And when lying is combined with secrecy, there is usually a pretty good roadmap in front of us. Yes, follow the money. But follow also the lies."
  • "I know of no important story that I've worked on in more than half a century of reporting that ended up where I thought it would go when I started on it."
  • "Almost all of our sources in Watergate were people who had, at one time or another, been committed to Richard Nixon and his presidency."
  • "Incremental reporting is essential. We wrote more than 200 stories in Watergate."

Woodward:

  • Carl "obtained a list of people who worked at Nixon's reelection campaign committee, not surprisingly, from a former girlfriend. [Laughter] He's finally embarrassed."
  • "No one would talk. Carl said, 'Here's what we have to do,' launching a system of going to the homes of people, knocking on doors when we had no appointment."
  • "[I]n 2017, the impatience and speed of the Internet — and our own rush — can disable and undermine the most important tool of journalism ... that luxury of time to inquire, to pursue, to find the real agents of genuine news, witnesses, participants, documents, to dive into the cab."
  • "Like politicians and presidents, sometimes, perhaps too frequently, we make mistakes and go too far. When that happens, we should own up to it. But the effort today to get this best obtainable version of the truth is largely made in good faith. Mr. President, the media is not fake news." [Applause]
  • "The indispensable centrality of fact-based reporting is careful, scrupulous listening and an open mind. President Nixon once said, 'The problem with journalists is that they look in the mirror when they should be looking out the window.' That is certainly one thing that Nixon said that Carl and I agree with."
  • "Whatever the climate, whether the media is revered or reviled, we should and must persist, and I believe we will. We also need to face the reality that polling numbers show that most Americans disapprove of and distrust the media. This is no time for self-satisfaction or smugness."
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Inside Trump's NAFTA reversal

Photo by "Face the Nation" Executive Producer Mary Hager

CBS's John Dickerson asked Trump what he knows on Day 100 of his presidency that he wishes he knew on day one:

Trump: "Well, one of the things that I've learned is how dishonest the media is, really... NAFTA, as you know: I was going to terminate it, but I got a very nice call from a man I like, the president of Mexico.

"I got a very nice call from Justin Trudeau, the prime minister of Canada. And they said: Please, would you rather than terminating NAFTA — I was all set to do it. In fact, I was going to do it today. I was going to do it as we're sitting here....

"But they called up and they said, 'Would you negotiate?' And I said, 'Yes, I will negotiate.' ... But the media didn't cover it that way. The media said, oh, I didn't terminate NAFTA."