Workers from United Auto Workers Local 440 picket at an entrance of General Motors' Bedford Powertrain factory during national labor strike against GM. Photo: SOPA Images/Contributor/Getty Images

The United Auto Workers strike against General Motors will continue for at least another week as union members vote on whether to ratify a tentative contract agreement.

Why it matters: The unusual decision by some 200 local union leaders from GM plants around the country means the economic pain for the company, its employees and suppliers will continue to mount at least through Oct. 25, when voting at local union halls is scheduled to conclude.

Driving the news: GM and the UAW reached a tentative labor deal on Wednesday that provides raises and big bonuses with no increase in workers' out-of-pocket health care costs.

  • But it did not solve the contentious issue over plant closures throughout the United States.
  • Three of four plants that GM earmarked for closure last November will now be permanently shuttered.
  • No work is being transferred from Mexico, as UAW negotiators sought.
  • Missing from contract highlights provided to workers was any mention of GM's commitment to U.S. investments in plants or new products.
  • GM, according to a person familiar with the talks, had previously indicated the company would invest up to $9 billion in U.S. factories, including a battery facility in Lordstown, Ohio, near the site of its shuttered assembly plant.
  • A UAW spokesperson ducked questions about GM product commitments, saying the battery facility, for example, is not subject to the labor agreement.

Go deeper:

Go deeper

Mike Allen, author of AM
1 hour ago - Politics & Policy

Biden pushes unity message in new TV wave

A fresh Joe Biden ad, "New Start," signals an effort by his campaign to make unity a central theme, underscoring a new passage in his stump speech that says he won't be a president just for Democrats but for all Americans.

What he's saying: The ad — which began Friday night, and is a follow-up to "Fresh Start" — draws from a Biden speech earlier in the week in Manitowoc, Wisconsin:

Updated 2 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 6:30 p.m. ET: 32,390,204 — Total deaths: 985,302 — Total recoveries: 22,286,345Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 6:30 p.m ET: 7,020,967 — Total deaths: 203,481 — Total recoveries: 2,710,183 — Total tests: 98,476,600Map.
  3. States: "We’re not closing anything going forward": Florida fully lifts COVID restaurant restrictions — Virginia Gov. Ralph Northam tests positive for coronavirus.
  4. Health: Young people accounted for 20% of cases this summer.
  5. Business: Coronavirus has made airports happier places The expiration of Pandemic Unemployment Assistance looms.
  6. Education: Where bringing students back to school is most risky.

Trump prepares to announce Amy Coney Barrett as Supreme Court replacement

Judge Amy Coney Barrett. Photo: Matt Cashore/Notre Dame University via Reuters

President Trump is preparing to nominate federal appeals court Judge Amy Coney Barrett of Indiana, a favorite of both the social conservative base and Republican elected officials, to succeed Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, Republican sources tell Axios.

Why it matters: Barrett would push the already conservative court further and harder to the right, for decades to come, on the most important issues in American politics — from abortion to the limits of presidential power. If confirmed, she would give conservatives a 6-3 majority on the high court.