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Photo: United Auto Workers General Motors Training Center in Detroit, Michigan. Photo: Jeff Kowalsky/Contributor/ Getty Images

Factory workers at General Motors will receive big bonuses and keep their lucrative health benefits under a proposed four-year labor contract, but union bargainers were unable to rescue three U.S. factories slated for closure.

Why it matters: The deal ends the longest nationwide strike at GM in a half-century. But relations remain raw as the automaker and its workforce struggle to adjust to disruptive technology changes roiling the industry.

Details: The economic benefits for workers are among the best in years, a reward for their sacrifices during GM's 2009 bankruptcy.

  • Workers will receive 3% raises in the second and fourth years of their contracts and 4% lump sums in the first and third years.
  • They'll also receive $11,000 each when the contract is ratified ($4,500 for temporary workers) and no limit to the amount of year-end profit-sharing they could receive, which hit a record $10,750 last year.
  • Workers will retain their current health care benefits, with no additional out-of-pocket costs.
  • The deal shortens the pathway for lower-paid temporary workers to achieve full-time status.
  • There is no immediate estimate on how the package will affect GM's fixed labor costs.

Yes, but: Three of the four plants GM targeted for closing last November will indeed close for good, and there was no agreement to bring work back from Mexico, a major point of contention for the UAW.

  • Workers who have not already moved to other plants will be offered buyouts and early retirement deals.
  • GM is offering early retirement bonuses of up to $60,000 for 2,000 hourly workers and 60 skilled-trades workers who agree to leave.
  • The Lordstown, Ohio, assembly plant and two transmission plants in Maryland and Michigan will close.
  • The fourth plant, in Detroit, will be retooled to manufacture a future electric pickup truck.
  • Contract highlights (below) shared with UAW leaders at a meeting Thursday did not mention future investment in U.S. factories, but earlier reports said GM planned to invest $7.7 billion in the U.S., plus another $1.3 billion for a new battery facility in Ohio.

The impact: The plant closures are no doubt a disappointment for President Trump, who campaigned on a promise to bring manufacturing jobs back to the U.S.

Go deeper: Buckle up: GM, Michigan and 2020

Go deeper

2 hours ago - Health

Ipsos poll: COVID trick-or-treat

Data: Axios/Ipsos poll; Note ±3.3% margin of error for the total sample size; Chart: Andrew Witherspoon/Axios

About half of Americans are worried that trick-or-treating will spread coronavirus in their communities, according to this week's installment of the Axios/Ipsos Coronavirus Index.

Why it matters: This may seem like more evidence that the pandemic is curbing our nation's cherished pastimes. But a closer look reveals something more nuanced about Americans' increased acceptance for risk around activities in which they want to participate.

Updated 10 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Health: The good and bad news about antibody therapies — Fauci: Hotspots have materialized across "the entire country."
  2. World: Belgium imposes lockdown, citing "health emergency" due to influx of cases.
  3. Economy: Conference Board predicts economy won’t fully recover until late 2021.
  4. Education: Surge threatens to shut classrooms down again.
  5. Technology: The pandemic isn't slowing tech.
  6. Travel: CDC replaces COVID-19 cruise ban with less restrictive "conditional sailing order."
  7. Sports: High school football's pandemic struggles.
  8. 🎧Podcast: The vaccine race turns toward nationalism.
Dan Primack, author of Pro Rata
Updated 10 hours ago - Economy & Business

Dunkin' Brands agrees to $11B Inspire Brands sale

Photo: Alexi Rosenfeld/Getty Images

Dunkin' Brands, operator of both Dunkin' Donuts and Baskin-Robbins, agreed on Friday to be taken private for nearly $11.3 billion, including debt, by Inspire Brands, a restaurant platform sponsored by private equity firm Roark Capital.

Why it matters: Buying Dunkin’ will more than double Inspire’s footprint, making it one of the biggest restaurant deals in the past 10 years. This could ultimately set up an IPO for Inspire, which already owns Arby's, Jimmy John's and Buffalo Wild Wings.