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Screenshot: Fox News

Fox News Channel was the most-watched network in prime time, counting both broadcast and cable, for three out of four weeks in June, AP's David Bauder writes.

Why it matters: Before this month, that had never happened. Ever. June is traditionally a slow month for broadcast television, with the schedule crammed with reruns and game shows. And it has been a busy news stretch.

The star power of Sean Hannity and Tucker Carlson in the conservative firmament lifted Fox to heights it had never reached.

  • Each host had four shows among Nielsen's top 20 last week, led by Hannity's Thursday night interview with President Trump.

ABC's "World News Tonight" with David Muir averaged more viewers last week than any prime-time show on television, Nielsen said.

  • "World News Tonight" led the evening newscasts with an average of 8.9 million viewers, NBC's "Nightly News" had 7.5 million and the "CBS Evening News" had 5.3 million.

Go deeper: Streaming price hikes make it less of a cheap cable alternative

Go deeper

Sep 21, 2020 - Economy & Business

Award show viewership drops to record lows

Expand chart
Data: Nielsen; Chart: Axios Visuals

Viewership of Sunday's 72nd Primetime Emmy Awards dropped 11% year-over-year to 6.1 million viewers, according to preliminary ratings from Nielsen. Viewership from people ages 18-49, the prized advertising demographic, fell to a new low of just 1.2 million viewers.

Why it matters: Award shows have been experiencing a terminal ratings decline in recent years, alongside traditional television viewership more broadly. Even before the pandemic, the Oscars and Grammys saw historically low ratings earlier this year.

The social media addiction bubble

Illustration: Annelise Capossela/Axios

Right now, everyone from Senate leaders to the makers of Netflix's popular "Social Dilemma" is promoting the idea that Facebook is addictive.

Yes, but: Human beings have raised fears about the addictive nature of every new media technology since the 18th century brought us the novel, yet the species has always seemed to recover its balance once the initial infatuation wears off.

Young people's next big COVID test

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

Young, healthy people will be at the back of the line for coronavirus vaccines, and they'll have to maintain their sense of urgency as they wait their turn — otherwise, vaccinations won't be as effective in bringing the pandemic to a close.

The big picture: "It’s great young people are anticipating the vaccine," said Jewel Mullen, associate dean for health equity at the University of Texas. But the prospect of that enthusiasm waning is "a cause for concern," she said.