Fox News TV host Laura Ingraham. Photo: Alex Wong / Getty Images

Early data from YouGov's Brand Index, which measures daily consumer perceptions of brands, reveals that Fox News Channel's brand is experiencing more perception damage than any of the advertisers that have boycotted Laura Ingraham’s television show so far.

Why it matters: Fox News co-president Jack Abernethy says the network still supports Ingraham, who's currently taking a scheduled leave amid fallout from tweets mocking Parkland school shooting survivor David Hogg.

Advertising time was slashed by more than 50% on the program in the wake of boycotts, according to data from Kantar Media. Among the companies announcing their withdrawal from Ingraham Angle, five were Top 20 spenders in the show during Q1 2018. They include:

  • Bayer AG Group
  • Hulu Llc
  • Johnson & Johnson
  • Liberty Mutual Insurance Co
  • Wayfair Llc
"We cannot and will not allow voices to be censored by agenda-driven intimidation efforts. We look forward to having Laura Ingraham back hosting her program next Monday when she returns from spring vacation with her children."
— Jack Abernethy, co-president of Fox News, in a statement to the Los Angeles Times.

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1 hour ago - Economy & Business

Big Tech's share of the S&P 500 reached record level in August

Expand chart
Reproduced from The Leuthold Group; Chart: Axios Visuals

The gap between the weighting of the five largest companies in the S&P 500 and the 300 smallest rose to the highest ever at the end of August, according to data from the Leuthold Group.

Why it matters: The concentration of wealth in a few massive U.S. tech companies has reached a scale significantly greater than it was before the dot-com bubble burst.

Fortune 100 companies commit $3.3 billion to fight racism and inequality

Data: Fortune 500, Axios analysis of company statements, get the data; Chart: Andrew Witherspoon, Naema Ahmed/Axios

Big businesses continue to push funding toward fighting inequality and racism, with the 100 largest U.S. companies' monetary commitments rising to $3.33 billion since the death of George Floyd at the hands of Minneapolis police earlier this year, according to an Axios analysis.

Why it matters: The continued pace of funding commitments shows that months after Floyd's death there remains pressure for the wealthiest corporations to put their money behind social issues and efforts.