Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Photo: Maddie Meyer/Getty Images

The Trump administration is rescinding new guidance from Immigrations and Customs Enforcement that would have forced some international students to transfer schools or leave the U.S. if their classes were held completely online in the fall.

Why it matters: The guidance was immediately met with broad backlash and lawsuits backed by more than 200 universities and 18 states. The decision to rescind the guidance and return to the policy in place since March was announced in a Tuesday hearing for the lawsuit brought by Harvard and MIT.

The big picture: U.S. officials provided no justification for the ICE policy, which could have upended the lives of many of the approximately one million international students currently studying at U.S. colleges.

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Go deeper: Here's how many student visas the U.S. issues each year

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Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

K-12 students throughout the southern region of the U.S. are returning to school during the coronavirus pandemic, resulting in crowded halls, quarantines and chaos.

The big picture: Students across the country are gearing up to hit the books once again while managing social distancing and mask mandates. Districts and communities are taking a variety of approaches, some of which include hybrid online, at-home class models or schooling-from-home.

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Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

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Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

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Why it matters: As Congress deadlocks over pandemic relief and President Trump issues executive orders of dubious potency, many Americans are suffering from a quintuple whammy: unemployment, overdue rent, mounting bills, food insecurity and health fears.