Sign up for our daily briefing

Make your busy days simpler with Axios AM/PM. Catch up on what's new and why it matters in just 5 minutes.

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Catch up on coronavirus stories and special reports, curated by Mike Allen everyday

Catch up on coronavirus stories and special reports, curated by Mike Allen everyday

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Denver news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Denver

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Des Moines news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Des Moines

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Minneapolis-St. Paul news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Twin Cities

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Tampa Bay news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Tampa Bay

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Charlotte news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Charlotte

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Courtesy Forbes

Forbes on Wednesday released its annual list of the 'World's 100 Most Powerful Women," with history-making figures like Vice President-elect Kamala Harris and New Zealand Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern among those featured.

Zoom in: 13 of the women named "helm some of the world’s biggest banks and financial institutions, positions they’ve leveraged to effect change in the world," Forbes' Samantha Todd writes.

  • Jane Fraser (No. 23), president of Citi and CEO of the global consumer banking business, in February becomes the first woman to head up a major Wall Street bank.
  • Anne Finucane (No. 36), vice chairman of Bank of America, has expanded the bank's "philanthropic efforts, committing $100 million in grants to increase the accessibility of food and medical supplies ... 'As we collectively navigate this health and humanitarian crisis, we recognize that the private sector can play a pivotal role,'" Finucane said in a statement.
  • No. 40: Mary Callahan Erdoes, CEO, asset management, JPMorgan Chase.
  • No. 43: Marianne Lake, CEO, consumer lending, JPMorgan Chase.
  • "Of the 13 women in finance, just one is a newcomer to the ranking: Mellody Hobson (No. 94), co-CEO of money management firm Ariel Investments."

For the 10th consecutive year, German Chancellor Angela Merkel is No. 1. Christine Lagarde, president of the European Central Bank, is No. 2. Vice President-elect Harris is No. 3. Queen Elizabeth II is No. 46.

Go deeper

Meena Harris business creates optics issue for Biden White House

Meena Harris addresses the 2020 Democratic National Convention. Photo: DNCC via Getty Images

Biden's transition team lawyers have reminded Vice President-elect Kamala Harris' niece, Meena, that she can't profit off her famous aunt's image, after she unveiled a collaboration between her company and Beats By Dre.

Why it matters: Following Republican attacks, President-elect Joe Biden pledged that neither his family nor Harris' would profit from their service as president and vice president.

Mike Allen, author of AM
2 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Biden-Harris, Day 1: What mattered most

President Joe Biden and first lady Dr. Jill Biden arrive at the North Portico of the White House. Photo: Alex Brandon-Pool/Getty Images

The Axios experts help you sort significance from symbolism. Here are the six Day 1 actions by President Biden that matter most.

Driving the news: Today, on his first full day, Biden translates his promise of a stronger federal response to the pandemic into action — starting with 10 executive orders and other directives, Caitlin Owens writes.

Read: Pete Buttigieg's opening statement ahead of confirmation hearing

Pete Buttigieg, President Biden's nominee to be secretary of transportation, in December. Photo: Kevin Lamarque/AFP via Getty Images

Pete Buttigieg, President Biden's nominee to lead the Transportation Department, will tell senators he plans to prioritize the health and safety of public transportation systems during the pandemic — and look to infrastructure projects to rebuild the economy — according to a copy of his prepared remarks obtained by Axios.

Driving the news: Buttigieg will testify at 10 a.m. ET before the Senate Committee on Commerce, Science and Transportation. He is expected to face a relatively smooth confirmation process, though GOP lawmakers may press him on "green" elements of Biden's transportation proposals.