Sep 12, 2017

Florida begins path to recovery after Irma

The remnants of Hurricane Irma moved north through Florida yesterday, bringing severe flash flooding to Jacksonville and dumping rain on Georgia and South Carolina. By Tuesday morning, roughly 15 million people in Florida were without power, according to the Department of Homeland Security. At least 48 people have died as a result of the storm, including at least 13 in the continental U.S., per AP.

Meanwhile in the Florida Keys, an estimated 25% of homes were destroyed and another 65% suffered "major damage," FEMA director Brock Long said. Conditions are so bad that the Defense Department estimated that the 10,000 people who rode out the storm may need to be evacuated. "My heart goes out to the people in the Keys," said Florida Gov. Rick Scott. "There's devastation. I just hope everybody survived. It's horrible what we saw."

Live updates:

  • Irma was downgraded to a tropical depression Monday night as it moved toward the Tennessee Valley.
  • Jacksonville, Florida, sheriff officials tweeted that 356 people were rescued from flooding on Monday.
  • In Georgia, wind gusts reached 64 mph in Atlanta, and the coastal city of Brunswick saw over 6 inches of rain.
  • Charleston, South Carolina, experienced a nearly 10-foot storm surge and 5-6 inches of rain.
  • About 94,000 people remain in Florida shelters, according to state officials
  • President Trump will visit Florida on Thursday, according to Sarah Sanders.

Go deeper: Irma's evolving forecast.

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America's future looks a lot like Nevada

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

Today's Nevada caucus will foreshadow the future of American politics well beyond 2020.

Why it matters: The U.S. is in the midst of a demographic transformation, and the country's future looks a lot like Nevada's present. Today's results, in addition to shaping the 2020 race, will help tell us where politics is headed in a rapidly changing country.

Coronavirus spreads to more countries, and U.S. ups its case count

Data: The Center for Systems Science and Engineering at Johns Hopkins, the CDC, and China's Health Ministry. Note: China numbers are for the mainland only and U.S. numbers include repatriated citizens.

The novel coronavirus continues to spread to more nations, and the U.S. reports a doubling of its confirmed cases to 34 — while noting those are mostly due to repatriated citizens, emphasizing there's no "community spread" yet in the U.S. Meanwhile, Italy reported its first virus-related death on Friday.

The big picture: COVID-19 has now killed at least 2,359 people and infected more than 77,000 others, mostly in mainland China. New countries to announce infections recently include Israel, Lebanon and Iran.

Go deeperArrowUpdated 14 hours ago - Health