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Leah Hogsten / The Salt Lake Tribune via AP

The Energy Information Administration's (EIA) most recent Residential Energy Consumption Survey revealed that the average number of televisions in American homes is declining. One notable factor is that younger households tend to have a lower concentration of TVs per person, and a higher concentration of portable devices — like laptops and smart phones. Other findings:

  • An average of 2.3 TVs were in American homes in 2015, down from an average of 2.6 TVs in 2009.
  • Number of homes with 3 or more TVs have declined since 2009, and a larger share of homes reported not using a TV at all.
  • TVs and the equipment that accompanies them — cable boxes, DVRs, video game consoles — account for about 6% of all electricity consumption in U.S. homes.
  • Older houses are more likely to have higher concentrations of desktop computers.

Quick take: The data is just more proof of changing media consumption habits among younger consumers, who are increasingly cutting the cord of traditional TV service in favor of watching content on mobile devices and laptops.

Go deeper

2 hours ago - Health

U.S. surpasses 25 million COVID cases

A mass COVID-19 vaccination site at Dodger Stadium on Jan. 22 in Los Angeles, California. Photo: Mario Tama/Getty Images

The U.S has confirmed more than 25 million coronavirus cases, per Johns Hopkins data updated on Sunday.

The big picture: President Biden has said he expects the country's death toll to exceed 500,000 people by next month, as the rate of deaths due to the virus continues to escalate.

GOP implosion: Trump threats, payback

Spotted last week on a work van in Evansville, Ind. Photo: Sam Owens/The Evansville Courier & Press via Reuters

The GOP is getting torn apart by a spreading revolt against party leaders for failing to stand up for former President Trump and punish his critics.

Why it matters: Republican leaders suffered a nightmarish two months in Washington. Outside the nation’s capital, it's even worse.

Erica Pandey, author of @Work
6 hours ago - Economy & Business

The limits of Biden's plan to cancel student debt

Data: New York Fed Consumer Credit Panel/Equifax; Chart: Axios Visuals

There’s a growing consensus among Americans who want President Biden to cancel student debt — but addressing the ballooning debt burden is much more complicated than it seems.

Why it matters: Student debt is stopping millions of Americans from buying homes, buying cars and starting families. And the crisis is rapidly getting worse.