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An aerial view of the Negrohead Lake in Baytown, Texas. Photo: FRANCOIS PICARD/AFP via Getty Images

The U.S. Board on Geographic Names on Thursday unanimously approved several requests to remove "Negro" from the names of 16 sites in Texas, the Washington Post reports.

Why it matters: The federal board in 1991 denied a similar request after Texas lawmakers passed legislation to rename the sites after Black people who made notable contributions to the state, per the Texas Tribune.

What they're saying: "This day has been a long time coming, but I am proud to see this change finally happen," Harris County Commissioner Rodney Ellis said in a statement Thursday, per the Post.

  • "I hope that the [U.S. Board on Geographic Names] will build on the progress made today in Texas, and work with other groups across the country to ensure that all racially offensive names are erased from the public domain," he added.

The agency also approved the sites' replacement names, "all of which are largely Texas-related heroes," the Post notes.

The big picture: More than 1,000 towns, lakes, streams, creeks and mountain peaks across the U.S. continue to bear racist names, Axios' Russell Contreras writes.

Worth noting: The U.S. Board on Geographic Names works under the Interior Department and is in charge of maintaining "uniform geographic name usage throughout the Federal Government." Geographic names are then added on a registry, "which companies like Apple and Google rely on for their maps services," the Post writes.

Go deeper: Hundreds of places with racist names dot the U.S.

Go deeper

Exclusive: EV charging providers to allow roaming across their networks

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

Greenlots, Chargepoint and several other electric vehicle charging companies will allow roaming access across their networks, a move that could help speed EV adoption.

Why it matters: Your phone works on any mobile network, no matter which provider you use. And you can use any bank's ATM machine, regardless of where you keep your money. Now the same will be true of EV charging.

Ina Fried, author of Login
Updated 20 mins ago - Technology

Windows goes to 11

Screenshot: Axios

Microsoft on Thursday offered a first look at Windows 11, coming this holiday season. The new version changes both the look of the operating system as well as its underlying business model, as well as supporting Android apps for the first time.

Why it matters: Windows has been steadily losing market share on the desktop, which has itself lost prominence to smartphones.

Rudy Giuliani suspended from practicing law in New York

Photo: Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Rudy Giuliani has been suspended from practicing law in the state of New York due to his false statements about the 2020 election, according to a court filing.

Driving the news: A New York court ruled that Giuliani made "demonstrably false and misleading statements to courts, lawmakers and the public at large in his capacity as lawyer for former President Donald J. Trump."