U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Xiara Mercado stands at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii. Photo: Xiara Mercado via AP

America in 2019: 13 days after El Paso, Latinos are increasingly vocalizing their fear of attacks motivated by their race, ethnicity and culture.

What they're saying: “It’s really hard to be alive as an immigrant right now and to not be sick and exhausted,” Karla Cornejo Villavicencio told the N.Y. Times. “It feels like being hunted.”

Why it matters: This political climate is egged on by President Trump's rhetoric against Mexicans and others.

  • Trump tweeted in January: "More troops being sent to the Southern Border to stop the attempted Invasion of Illegals, through large Caravans, into our Country."
  • And last June: "We cannot allow all of these people to invade our Country."
  • Trump in 2015: "The Mexican Government is forcing their most unwanted people into the United States. They are, in many cases, criminals, drug dealers, rapists, etc.”

The El Paso shooter wrote in his manifesto: "This attack is a response to the Hispanic invasion of Texas."

The result: Latinos, most of whom are U.S.-born, are afraid, as a powerful USA Today story shows.

  • “As we saw, it didn’t really matter if you were a citizen or not when people were getting shot up ... It was primarily that hatred against Latinos, specifically Mexican Americans, and that was very clear in the manifesto written by the shooter.”— Angélica Cesar, Arizona
  • "Parents, even kids, get scared because they don't know how it's going to be when they go back to school." — Luis Espinoza, Mississippi
  • “I’m definitely angry. I’m angry … because this is the manifestation of the hate speech that was unleashed in our political arena and has just been poisoning our community from the top down." — La Lisa Hernandez, Texas

The bottom line: “I don’t think you could ever imagine something like this happening,” Mario Carrillo of Austin told the Washington Post. “But I feel like you’d be hard-pressed to say it’s surprising, given the rhetoric.”

Go deeper

Axios-Ipsos poll: Fear of voting

Data: Axios/Ipsos poll; Note: ±3.0% margin of error for the total sample; Chart: Andrew Witherspoon/Axios

Democrats are twice as likely as Republicans to worry about in-person voting — with nearly two in three seeing it as a large or moderate risk to their health — according to this week's installment of the Axios-Ipsos Coronavirus Index.

Why it matters: This could pose a significant disadvantage for Joe Biden and other Democratic candidates in November if the pattern holds — especially in states where high infection rates persist, or where there are significant hurdles to mail-in, absentee or early voting.

Trump: Coronavirus is “under control"

President Trump said in an interview with “Axios on HBO” that he thinks the coronavirus is as well-controlled in the U.S. as it can be, despite dramatic surges in new infections over the course of the summer and more than 150,000 American deaths.

  • “They are dying, that's true. And you have — it is what it is. But that doesn't mean we aren't doing everything we can. It's under control as much as you can control it. This is a horrible plague,” he told Axios' Jonathan Swan.
Updated 2 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 12:30 a.m. ET: 18,288,573 — Total deaths: 693,805 — Total recoveries — 10,916,907Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 12:30 a.m. ET: 4,713,562 — Total deaths: 155,469 — Total recoveries: 1,513,446 — Total tests: 57,543,852Map.
  3. Education — Fauci: Schools can reopen with safeguards, but those in virus hot spots should remain closed
  4. Politics: White House will require staff to undergo randomized coronavirus testing — Pelosi says Birx "enabled" Trump on misinformation.
  5. Sports: 13 members of St. Louis Cardinals test positive, prompting MLB to cancel Tigers series — Former FDA chief says MLB outbreaks should be warning sign for schools.
  6. 1 🎥 thing: "Tenet" may be the first major film to get a global pandemic release.