Updated Mar 31, 2020 - Health

CORRECTION: The FDA has not approved a two-minute coronavirus test

Axios incorrectly reported on Tuesday that the Food and Drug Administration had signed off on a new and faster type of coronavirus test. We have removed that inaccurate story from our website.

What happened: A medical distribution company called Bodysphere said in a press release that the FDA had granted an “emergency use authorization” that could allow patients to get a diagnosis in only about two minutes.

  • Axios reprinted that incorrect information, based on the press release.
  • But the FDA confirmed Wednesday that it has not issued such an authorization. No two-minute diagnosis is available.

Axios' policy is to correct our mistakes and not to delete them.

  • But because this story was premised entirely on the significance of an FDA action that didn't actually happen, and because diagnosing coronavirus is such an urgent and sensitive subject for so many people, we have removed this story in an effort to avoid causing any further confusion. We apologize for our mistake.

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May 22, 2020 - Health

Update: Study linking hydroxychloroquine to increased death risk is retracted

Hydroxychloroquine. Photo: George Frey/AFP via Getty Images

Editor’s note: The study referenced in this story has been retracted by the medical journal The Lancet due to questions on the veracity of its primary data sources. Read more here.

Coronavirus patients who took hydroxychloroquine or its related drug chloroquine were more likely to die or develop an irregular heart rhythm that can lead to sudden cardiac death, compared to those who did nothing, a retrospective review published in The Lancet shows.

Why it matters: Despite warnings from the Food and Drug Administration, President Trump has insisted the anti-malarial drug as a "game-changer" and admitted he has taken it as a preventative even though the drug is unproven.

Where the CDC went wrong with its coronavirus response

Photo: Tami Chappell/AFP/Getty Images

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention mishandled the coronavirus pandemic, sowing mistrust among health experts and the public, according to a sweeping report by the New York Times.

Why it matters: It's been reported that a faster and more organized response from the federal government could have saved thousands of lives.

22 hours ago - Health

Medical journal retracts study that fueled hydroxychloroquine concerns

Photo: George Frey/AFP via Getty Images

The Lancet medical journal retracted a study on Thursday that found that coronavirus patients who took hydroxychloroquine had a higher mortality rate and increased heart problem than those who did nothing, stating that the authors were "unable to complete an independent audit of the data underpinning their analysis."

Why it matters: The results of the study, which claimed to have analyzed data from nearly 96,000 patients on six continents, led several governments to ban the use of the anti-malarial drug for coronavirus patients due to safety concerns.