Feb 3, 2019

Facebook users in the U.S. and Canada are the most valuable

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Data: Company filings; Chart: Axios Visuals

Facebook makes the majority of its revenue off of users in the U.S. and Canada, but its user growth in those countries has slowed dramatically. 

By the numbers: A Facebook user in the U.S. is 3 times more valuable than a Facebook user in Europe, 10 times more valuable than a Facebook user in the Asia-Pacific region, and 15 times more valuable than a user in the rest of the world. The U.S. is by far the world's most lucrative ad market, worth over $200 billion, per estimates from Zenith, a global media agency. China, where Facebook is blocked, is the second biggest, at $87 billion. Japan is a distant third at $43 billion. 

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