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Photo: Facebook

After a year of scandals, Facebook lost its place as the best company to work at, according to Glassdoor. Facebook fell from first to seventh in the survey.

Why it matters: While customer defections or new regulations could both be longer-term consequences of the company's many trials, employee retention could be the most immediate challenge.

The bigger picture: The Glassdoor survey follows a largely anecdotal report from CNBC that more Facebook employees have been seeking references from former coworkers.

The Wall Street Journal reported last month that surveys showed morale taking a hit after a year that has included a number of unflattering revelations and a declining stock price.

Yes, but: Facebook is still among the top firms in the survey.

By the numbers:

  • In all, there were 29 tech companies among the top 100, including Zoom Video Communications at No. 2, behind only Bain & Co.
  • Google, at No. 8, is just one place below Facebook.
  • Microsoft-owned LinkedIn was 6th, up from 21st.
  • Apple, which is one of only three companies that has been on the list all 11 years of the survey, moved up to No. 71, from No. 84 last year.
  • Other tech firms on the list include Hubspot (No. 16), Docusign (No. 17), Ultimate Software (No. 18), Paylocity (No. 20), SAP (No. 27) Adobe (No. 30), Microsoft (No. 34), Nvidia (No. 36), Intuit (No. 38)

Go deeper

2 hours ago - Health

U.S. surpasses 25 million COVID cases

A mass COVID-19 vaccination site at Dodger Stadium on Jan. 22 in Los Angeles, California. Photo: Mario Tama/Getty Images

The U.S has confirmed more than 25 million coronavirus cases, per Johns Hopkins data updated on Sunday.

The big picture: President Biden has said he expects the country's death toll to exceed 500,000 people by next month, as the rate of deaths due to the virus continues to escalate.

GOP implosion: Trump threats, payback

Spotted last week on a work van in Evansville, Ind. Photo: Sam Owens/The Evansville Courier & Press via Reuters

The GOP is getting torn apart by a spreading revolt against party leaders for failing to stand up for former President Trump and punish his critics.

Why it matters: Republican leaders suffered a nightmarish two months in Washington. Outside the nation’s capital, it's even worse.

Erica Pandey, author of @Work
6 hours ago - Economy & Business

The limits of Biden's plan to cancel student debt

Data: New York Fed Consumer Credit Panel/Equifax; Chart: Axios Visuals

There’s a growing consensus among Americans who want President Biden to cancel student debt — but addressing the ballooning debt burden is much more complicated than it seems.

Why it matters: Student debt is stopping millions of Americans from buying homes, buying cars and starting families. And the crisis is rapidly getting worse.