Searching for smart, safe news you can TRUST?

Support safe, smart, REAL journalism. Sign up for our Axios AM & PM newsletters and get smarter, faster.

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Searching for smart, safe news you can TRUST?

Support safe, smart, REAL journalism. Sign up for our Axios AM & PM newsletters and get smarter, faster.

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Denver news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Denver

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Des Moines news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Des Moines

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Minneapolis-St. Paul news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Minneapolis-St. Paul

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Tampa-St. Petersburg news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Tampa-St. Petersburg

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Photo: Facebook

Facebook is launching a new online shopping marketplace called Facebook Shops, CEO Mark Zuckerberg announced Tuesday.

Why it matters: To date, most Facebook commerce has taken place between users via its Marketplace tab, a Craigslist-like feature, but Facebook Shops is at the center of its push to create an e-commerce platform for businesses.

The big picture: The move comes as more people are increasingly migrating to e-commerce during the coronavirus pandemic.

  • "A lot of these aren't just businesses, they're pillars of our communities that people have poured their lives into. ... One of the ways small businesses are surviving during this period is moving online. I think this is going to be a big part of the future of commerce anyway, but it's more important right now," Zuckerberg said.
  • He also added that more than 160 million small businesses around the world use Facebook services — mostly for free.

The state of play: Facebook Shops launches Tuesday in the U.S. It'll be free for businesses across Facebook and Instagram, allowing them to choose the products they want to feature and customize the look and feel of their shop with a cover image and accent colors.

  • Users can discover Facebook Shops pages on a business' own Facebook page or Instagram profile — as well as through stories or ads. Customers can also purchase through Facebook or Instagram using the company's virtual payments portal.
  • Users can message businesses via Facebook's messaging apps — WhatsApp, Messenger and Instagram Direct — to ask questions or get support. The tech giant says that in the future, users will be able to check out directly via those apps.
  • Zuckerberg said that Facebook Shops will eventually include augmented reality, allowing customers to try items on from home.

Facebook says it's also introducing Instagram Shop, beginning in the U.S., to help users buy products they encounter via the app's Explore tab.

  • It's also making it easier for influencers to hawk products via livestreams.

Between the lines: Facebook says it's working with commerce partners like Shopify, BigCommerce, WooCommerce, ChannelAdvisor, CedCommerce, Cafe24, Tienda Nube and Feedonomics to give small businesses the support they need.

The bottom line: This is Facebook's first step toward creating a competitor to more established online marketplaces, like eBay or Amazon.

Go deeper

Ina Fried, author of Login
Aug 27, 2020 - Technology

Facebook criticized for slow action against Kenosha militia page

An armed civilian stands in the streets of Kenosha during third day of protests over a police shooting. Photo: Tayfun Coskun/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images

After initially taking no action on militia pages organizing an armed counter-protest in Kenosha, Wisconsin, Facebook said Wednesday that the pages and related comments violate a just-enacted policy that imposes stricter limits on QAnon, militia and other extremist groups.

Why it matters: Facebook's handling of the issue raises fresh question about its ability and willingness to enforce policies in time to prevent violence rather than after the fact.

Aug 27, 2020 - Technology

Tech's deepening split over ads and privacy

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

A new fight between Facebook and Apple over the mechanics of ad tech is surfacing an industry divide over user privacy and spotlighting longstanding dilemmas about the tracking and use of personal information online.

Why it matters: Privacy advocates have been sounding alarms for years about tech firms' expansive, sometimes inescapable data harvesting without making much headway in the U.S. But the game could change if major industry players start taking opposite sides.

Apple's fight to separate online from IRL

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

Apple's longstanding rule for calculating its cut of transactions enabled through its iOS App Store depends on an apparently simple principle: If a good or service is digital, Apple takes 30%. If the good or service is physical, Apple doesn't.

The catch: Life doesn't divide neatly that way any more.