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Facebook headquarters in Menlo Park, California. Photo: Josh Edelson/AFP via Getty Images

Facebook has published the internal guidelines it uses to make tough decisions on sensitive topics on its platform, including hate speech, child safety and terrorism.

Why it matters: It's Facebook's way of telling censorship critics that the tech giant is methodological and consistent about how it polices content on its platform.

  • Facebook will also build out the ability for people to appeal its decisions over the coming year, something Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg has alluded to in past interviews. As a first step, it's launching appeals for posts that were removed for nudity, sexual activity, hate speech or graphic violence.
  • The company let a few reporters sit in on its regular content meeting last week, which typically includes employees from legal, safety policy, community operations, public policy (including regional), communications, community integrity, diversity, government and politics teams, product, etc.
  • In May, Facebook will launch Facebook Forums: Community Standards, a series of public events in Germany, France, the U.K., India, Singapore, the U.S. and other countries to get people's feedback directly.
  • By the numbers: Facebook says it currently has 7,500 content reviewers — more than 40% than it had last year — and has experts reviewing content reports in over 40 languages around the world.

Gut check: The majority of Americans (58%) are resistant to action by the U.S. government that might also limit free speech, but they're more open to action from technology companies themselves, a new Pew Research Center survey finds.

  • The issue isn't partisan. Democrats and Republicans are equally resistant to government action against false news that could limit freedoms.

Go deeper

In photos: D.C. and U.S. states on alert for pre-inauguration violence

National Guard troops stand behind security fencing with the dome of the U.S. Capitol Building behind them, on Jan. 16. Photo: Kent Nishimura / Los Angeles Times via Getty Images

Security has been stepped up in Washington, D.C., and state capitols across the U.S. as authorities brace for potential violence this weekend.

Driving the news: Following the Jan. 6 insurrection at the U.S. Capitol by some supporters of President Trump, the FBI has said there could be armed protests in D.C. and in all 50 state capitols in the run-up to President-elect Joe Biden's inauguration Wednesday.

11 hours ago - Politics & Policy

The new Washington

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

The Axios subject-matter experts brief you on the incoming administration's plans and team.

Rep. Lou Correa tests positive for COVID-19

Lou Correa. Photo: Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty Images

Rep. Lou Correa (D-Calif.) announced on Saturday that he has tested positive for the coronavirus.

Why it matters: Correa is the latest Democratic lawmaker to share his positive test results after last week's deadly Capitol riot. Correa did not shelter in the designated safe zone with his congressional colleagues during the siege, per a spokesperson, instead staying outside to help Capitol Police.