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Facebook is building a feature that will allow users to subscribe to publishers directly from its mobile app, the The Wall Street Journal reports. Sources say the feature will roll out by the end of the year and will likely only be available through Facebook's native news platform, Instant Articles.

Who keeps the cash? Facebook is reportedly considering a metered-payment model, where users could read some articles (sources tell WSJ potentially 10) for free each month before being asked to pay. The Journal reports that one model being considered is to have Facebook take users' payment information but let publishers keep all the revenue.

Compare: Apple News, a premium news distribution app that has roughly 70 million users, established a subscription revenue feature last year.

Why it matters: The report marks the latest of steps Facebook has taken to create a better relationship with its publishing partners. Facebook and Google's digital ad dominance has made it increasingly difficult for publishers to make digital ad revenue. As a result, many premium publishers, like The New York Times and Washington Post, are focusing efforts on increasing subscription revenues.

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Biden has huge cash advantage over Trump as Election Day nears

Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden in Wilmington, Delaware, on Monday. Photo: Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden had $177.3 million in the bank at the end of September, per the latest Federal Election Commission filings.

Why it matters: President Trump's re-election campaign reported having $63.1 million in the bank at the end of last month, as campaigning enters the final stretch ahead of Election Day on Nov. 3.

Court allows North Carolina mail-in ballots deadline extension

An absentee ballot election worker stuffs ballot applications at the Mecklenburg County Board of Elections office in Charlotte, North Carolina, in September. Photo: Logan Cyrus/AFP via Getty Images

North Carolina can accept absentee ballots that are postmarked Nov. 3, Election Day, until Nov. 12, a federal appeals court decided Tuesday in a 12-3 majority ruling.

Why it matters: The 4th Circuit Court of Appeals' ruling against state and national Republican leaders settles a lawsuit brought by a group representing retirees, and it could see scores of additional votes counted in the key battleground state.