Updated Mar 28, 2018

Facebook puts privacy settings front and center

Facebook

Facebook said Wednesday it is updating its terms of service to make its commitment to user privacy more explicit. It's also updating its data policy to better define what data it collects and how they use it as well as make its privacy tools easier to find.

Why it matters: While Facebook says the privacy updates have been in the works for a while, the past two weeks of reckoning around data privacy have put an emphasis on things Facebook should be doing to make privacy options more transparent and easier to understand for users.

Our thought bubble: The company notes that "these updates are about transparency – not about gaining new rights to collect, use, or share data." This means that Facebook is not looking to change how it processes user data or shares it with third-parties, but rather it is trying to be more transparent about the practices they've always employed.

What's changing:

  • Redesigned settings menu on mobile from top to bottom to make things easier to find. (Instead of having settings spread across nearly 20 different screens, they're now accessible from a single place.)
  • Cleaned up outdated settings so it's clear what information can and can't be shared with apps.
  • Creating a new Privacy Shortcuts menu to make information about privacy, security, and ads easier to find. Users can add layers of protection to their accounts (like two-factor authentication), review what they've shared and delete it if you want to and manage who sees your posts and profile information all within the new menu.

The company also says it will create an "Access Your Information" portal to manage their information, such as posts, reactions and comments, and things users have searched for — all of which can be deleted from a users' Timeline if desired from there. From there users can also download a secure copy of all of their data and even move it to another service.

Go deeper

U.S. coronavirus updates: 16 million Americans filed for unemployment benefits

Data: The Center for Systems Science and Engineering at Johns Hopkins; Map: Andrew Witherspoon/Axios

About 16 million Americans have filed for jobless benefits over the past three weeks due to the economic repercussions of the coronavirus pandemic.

The big picture: Both the federal government and individual states are surveying different models of when it will be safe enough to reopen some parts of the economy and allow Americans to return to work. President Trump is preparing to launch a second coronavirus task force focused on reviving the U.S. economy.

Go deeperArrowUpdated 2 mins ago - Health

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 1:30 p.m. ET: 1,506,936 — Total deaths: 90,057 — Total recoveries: 340,112Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 1:30 p.m. ET: 432,596 — Total deaths: 14,831 — Total recoveries: 24,235Map.
  3. Business latest: The Fed will lend up to $2.3 trillion for businesses, state and city governments — Another 6.6 million jobless claims were filed last week.
  4. Federal government latest: President Trump is preparing to launch a second coronavirus task force focused on reviving the U.S. economy.
  5. Public health latest: Dr. Anthony Fauci said social distancing could reduce the U.S. death toll to 60,000.
  6. States latest: New York's coronavirus death toll hits record high for third straight day.
  7. 🎧 Podcast: Your hydroxychloroquine questions answered.
  8. What should I do? Pets, moving and personal healthAnswers about the virus from Axios expertsWhat to know about social distancingQ&A: Minimizing your coronavirus risk.
  9. Other resources: CDC on how to avoid the virus, what to do if you get it.

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Trump plans second coronavirus task force focused on the economy

Photo: Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images

President Trump is preparing to launch a second coronavirus task force focused on reviving the U.S. economy, which has been battered by the coronavirus, two administration officials tell Axios.

Why it matters: There is growing energy within the West Wing to start easing people back to work by May 1. But some public health officials, including those on the coronavirus task force, have warned against doing so, raising concerns about reopening America too soon.