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Catch up on coronavirus stories and special reports, curated by Mike Allen everyday

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Photo: Johannes Simon/Getty Images

In an internal meeting with staff on Thursday, Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg said the company is planning to shift the majority of its workforce to be able to work remotely in the next 5-10 years.

Why it matters: The coronavirus pandemic has forced many companies to quickly adopt remote working strategies. Tech companies, which are well-equipped for remote work, are preparing to make remote work the new normal for most of their employees.

Zuckerberg told Axios: "My prediction is that in 5-10 years we could have ~50% working remote. That's not a target, just a prediction based on the demand we've seen so far."

  • "The first steps will be aggressively opening up remote hiring around the whole US and Canada, especially for experienced engineers, as well as letting some employees request to become permanent remote workers."

Details: In an interview with NBC, Zuckerberg said it "doesn't seem that good to constrain hiring to people who live around offices."

  • Zuckerberg says that the company plans to unlocking remote hiring immediately. In the past, Zuckerberg had implied that working in or near a Facebook office was important towards maintaining a strong workplace culture. Now, that idea seems less feasible and less necessary, given that the company continues to perform well despite more people working remotely.

Be smart: Facebook has already said that people can work remotely through the end of 2020 if they choose. It was one of the first companies to tell employees to start working from home, if possible, in the first place. It's already said that non-essential corporate travel is cancelled until 2021.

The big picture: More remote work will be a major trend coming out of the coronavirus. Big companies like Facebook will pioneer that trend.

  • Twitter and Square, both run by Jack Dorsey, announced last week that people could work from home indefinitely if they wanted to.

Go deeper: Many tech workers won't go back to offices after coronavirus crisis

Go deeper

Aug 26, 2020 - Technology

Facebook warns advertisers on Apple privacy changes

Illustration: Lazaro Gamio/Axios

Facebook is warning advertisers that they can expect weaker ad performance from iPhone users once iOS 14 comes out next month and is telling them to create second advertiser accounts to contain the disruption.

Why it matters: Many of Facebook's advertising partners rely on Apple's "Identifier for Advertisers" (IDFA) user tracking feature to, for instance, target would-be users by interest and see if they actually clicked on a mobile ad directing them to install a particular app. Changes to IDFA coming with iOS 14 will have a big impact on the marketing strategies for many businesses, and on Facebook's bottom line.

4 hours ago - Health

Biden says it's "not the time to relax" after touring vaccination site

President Biden speaking after visiting a FEMA Covid-19 vaccination facility in Houston on Feb. 26. Photo: Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images

President Biden said Friday that "it's not the time to relax" coronavirus mitigation efforts and warned that the number of cases and hospitalizations could rise again as new variants of the virus emerge.

Why it matters: Biden, who made the remarks after touring a vaccination site in Houston, echoed CDC director Rochelle Walensky, who said earlier on Friday that while the U.S. has seen a recent drop in cases and hospitalizations, "these declines follow the highest peak we have experienced in the pandemic."

Updated 4 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Annelise Capossela/Axios

  1. Health: Most COVID-19 survivors can weather risk of reinfection, study says — "Twindemic" averted as flu reports plummet amid coronavirus crisis
  2. Vaccine: FDA advisory panel endorses J&J COVID vaccine for emergency use — About 20% of U.S. adults have received first vaccine dose, White House says — New data reignites the debate over coronavirus vaccine strategy.
  3. Economy: What's really going on with the labor market.
  4. Local: All adult Minnesotans will likely be eligible for COVID-19 vaccine by summer — Another wealthy Florida community receives special access to COVID-19 vaccine.
  5. Sports: Poll weighs impact of athlete vaccination.