Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg told "Axios on HBO" that calls for data privacy and antitrust regulation in tech are often at odds.

Why it matters: Democrats and Republicans have pushed for antitrust enforcement as a cure for any number of Big Tech ills, and Americans feel frustrated that they don't have more control over their personal data when using digital services.

What he's saying: "On the one hand, a lot of privacy advocates and people writing the regulation are kind of trying to come up with new ways to force companies to lock down people's data, which I think makes sense," Zuckerberg told Axios' Mike Allen.

  • "But then you have the antitrust push, which is generally pushing to try to open up data and make it so that things can be more interoperable."
  • "I think that these are things that need to be decided by democratically elected officials and Congress, which is why I pushed for that. But I don't think that just breaking up the company solves the issues."

Of note: Germany's top court sided with the country's competition regulator in June to rule that Facebook abused its market power by illegally harvesting user data in Germany. Facebook's appeal is still pending, and it said in response to the ruling that there was no antitrust abuse.

Go deeper: Exclusive poll reveals Americans' data privacy frustrations

Editor's note: This story has been corrected to show that Germany's antitrust regulator brought a case on data collection against Facebook, not the country's top court.

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Ina Fried, author of Login
Sep 17, 2020 - Technology

Behind Facebook's giant bet on hardware

Photos: Facebook

Facebook's foray into virtual and augmented reality, which it doubled down on this week, is a bet on where the future of online social interaction is heading. But even more important to Facebook, it's also a plan to make sure the company owns a big piece of whatever platform ultimately supplants the smartphone.

Why it matters: In the smartphone era, Facebook has found itself at the mercy of Apple and — to a lesser degree — Google and Android phone makers. The company doesn't want to see history repeat itself.

Where key GOP senators stand on replacing Ruth Bader Ginsburg

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell talks to reporters on Capitol Hill last Thursday. Photo: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

With President Trump planning to nominate his third Supreme Court justice nominee this week, key Republican senators are indicating their stance on replacing the late Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg with less than 50 days until Election Day.

The state of play: Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (Ky.) has vowed that "Trump’s nominee will receive a vote on the floor of the United States Senate." Two GOP senators — Sen. Lisa Murkowski (R-Alaska) and Sen. Susan Collins (R-Maine) — have said they oppose holding a vote before the election, meaning that two more defections would force McConnell to delay until at least the lame-duck session of Congress.

Updated 2 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

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