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Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg told "Axios on HBO" that calls for data privacy and antitrust regulation in tech are often at odds.

Why it matters: Democrats and Republicans have pushed for antitrust enforcement as a cure for any number of Big Tech ills, and Americans feel frustrated that they don't have more control over their personal data when using digital services.

What he's saying: "On the one hand, a lot of privacy advocates and people writing the regulation are kind of trying to come up with new ways to force companies to lock down people's data, which I think makes sense," Zuckerberg told Axios' Mike Allen.

  • "But then you have the antitrust push, which is generally pushing to try to open up data and make it so that things can be more interoperable."
  • "I think that these are things that need to be decided by democratically elected officials and Congress, which is why I pushed for that. But I don't think that just breaking up the company solves the issues."

Of note: Germany's top court sided with the country's competition regulator in June to rule that Facebook abused its market power by illegally harvesting user data in Germany. Facebook's appeal is still pending, and it said in response to the ruling that there was no antitrust abuse.

Go deeper: Exclusive poll reveals Americans' data privacy frustrations

Editor's note: This story has been corrected to show that Germany's antitrust regulator brought a case on data collection against Facebook, not the country's top court.

Go deeper

U.S. military buys app tracking data from private services

Photo: Spencer Platt via Getty

U.S. Special Operations Command (SOCOM) is quietly purchasing access to vast troves of real-time location and user data from commercial apps that focus on everything from dating services for Muslims to weather reports, according to a new Vice investigation.

Why it matters: Though legal, the purchase of these data tracking services by the U.S. military raises serious civil liberties and privacy questions — as well as questions about just how the military is employing this data.

3 hours ago - World

Map: A look at world population density in 3D

This fascinating map is made by Alasdair Rae of Sheffield, England, a former professor of urban studies who is the founder of Automatic Knowledge. It shows world population density in 3D.

Details: "No land is shown on the map, only the locations where people actually live. ... The higher the spike, the more people live in an area. Where there are no spikes, there are no people (e.g. you can clearly identify ... the Sahara Desert)."

Biden's Day 1 challenges: The immigration reset

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

President-elect Biden has an aggressive Day 1 immigration agenda that relies heavily on executive actions to undo President Trump's crackdown.

Why it matters: It's not that easy. Trump issued more than 400 executive actions on immigration. Advocates are fired up. The Supreme Court could threaten the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program, and experts warn there could be another surge at the border.