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Illustration: Lazaro Gamio/Axios

Facebook is rolling out a new function Tuesday which will allow people who work at news organizations to voluntarily register as a journalist on Facebook in order to receive access to benefits, tools and get stronger security features.

Why it matters: Journalists have become a primary target of foreign influence operations, who often use social media cyber attacks to hack accounts, harass journalists or steal their identities.

Details: Journalists who work for a news organization that has a registered news Page on Facebook can register as a journalist using their personal or professional Facebook account.

  • Registration will first be available to journalists in the U.S., Mexico, Brazil, and the Philippines.

What's next: Facebook plans to expand registration to more countries and languages in the coming months.

Go deeper

Oct 6, 2020 - Technology

Facebook bans QAnon across all its platforms

Photo: Stephanie Keith/Getty Images

Facebook announced on Tuesday it would ban all accounts, pages and groups representing the fringe conspiracy theory QAnon from its platforms.

Why it matters: Facebook previously banned or restricted hundreds of groups, pages and Instagram accounts that "demonstrated significant risks to public safety" due to their ties to QAnon, but the latest update goes even further — removing all accounts "even if they contain no violent content."

Updated Oct 6, 2020 - Politics & Policy

DeSantis will extend voter registration as Florida investigates system crash

Boxes with ballots are seen at the Miami-Dade County Election Department. Photo: Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis (R) announced Tuesday the state will extend the voter registration to 7 p.m. tonight after its online system crashed on Monday from an uptick in volume.

The big picture: The state is investigating the crash, which may have prevented thousands from registering before the original deadline, AP reports. Investigators are now working to determine if the crash was a "deliberate act."

Biden Cabinet confirmation schedule: When to watch hearings

Joe Biden and Kamala Harris on Jan. 16 in Wilmington, Delaware. Photo: Angela Weiss/AFP via Getty Images

The first hearings for President-elect Joe Biden's Cabinet nominations begin on Tuesday, with testimony from his picks to lead the departments of State, Homeland and Defense.

Why it matters: It's been a slow start for a process that usually takes place days or weeks earlier for incoming presidents. The first slate of nominees will appear on Tuesday before a Republican-controlled Senate, but that will change once the new Democratic senators-elect from Georgia are sworn in.