Illustration: Lazaro Gamio/Axios

Facebook is rolling out a new function Tuesday which will allow people who work at news organizations to voluntarily register as a journalist on Facebook in order to receive access to benefits, tools and get stronger security features.

Why it matters: Journalists have become a primary target of foreign influence operations, who often use social media cyber attacks to hack accounts, harass journalists or steal their identities.

Details: Journalists who work for a news organization that has a registered news Page on Facebook can register as a journalist using their personal or professional Facebook account.

  • Registration will first be available to journalists in the U.S., Mexico, Brazil, and the Philippines.

What's next: Facebook plans to expand registration to more countries and languages in the coming months.

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Oct 6, 2020 - Technology

Facebook bans QAnon across all its platforms

Photo: Stephanie Keith/Getty Images

Facebook announced on Tuesday it would ban all accounts, pages and groups representing the fringe conspiracy theory QAnon from its platforms.

Why it matters: Facebook previously banned or restricted hundreds of groups, pages and Instagram accounts that "demonstrated significant risks to public safety" due to their ties to QAnon, but the latest update goes even further — removing all accounts "even if they contain no violent content."

Updated Oct 6, 2020 - Politics & Policy

DeSantis will extend voter registration as Florida investigates system crash

Boxes with ballots are seen at the Miami-Dade County Election Department. Photo: Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis (R) announced Tuesday the state will extend the voter registration to 7 p.m. tonight after its online system crashed on Monday from an uptick in volume.

The big picture: The state is investigating the crash, which may have prevented thousands from registering before the original deadline, AP reports. Investigators are now working to determine if the crash was a "deliberate act."

Amy Harder, author of Generate
3 hours ago - Energy & Environment

Climate change goes mainstream in presidential debate

Photo illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios. Photo: Olivier Douliery-Pool/Getty

The most notable part of Thursday’s presidential debate on climate change was the fact it was included as a topic and assumed as a fact.

The big picture: This is the first time in U.S. presidential history that climate change was a featured issue at a debate. It signals how the problem has become part of the fabric of our society. More extreme weather, like the wildfires ravaging Colorado, is pushing the topic to the front-burner.