Noah Berger / AP

Facebook has added a former top staffer for now-Attorney General Jeff Sessions to its policy team focused on the administration, the company tells Axios. Sandy Luff, who last worked for Sessions as his Legislative Director when he was serving in the Senate, will be Director of Executive Branch Public Policy at the tech giant. She also worked with the Trump transition team.

Facebook is staffing up its policy communications team, too. It has hired Nu Wexler, a veteran Democratic communications staffer who is well-known to the tech press as Twitter's former spokesman on policy issues.

Why it matters: Tech companies are having to adapt quickly to Trump's Washington. This hire gives Facebook a valuable link to an influential member of the administration who has taken positions on immigration and surveillance that don't sit well with Silicon Valley. Former Sessions aides — most notably Stephen Miller — also hold key administration posts.

The details: U.S. Army veteran Luff specialized in national security issues in the Senate and was described last year by Yahoo News as "very well regarded by Capitol Hill colleagues in both parties." The company's Vice President Of U.S. Public Policy, Greg Maurer, said in a statement that Luff's "experience and understanding of the political landscape will make her an invaluable asset to our team."

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Republicans, win or lose next week, face a big — and growing — math problem.

The state of play: They're relying almost exclusively on a shrinking demographic (white men), living in shrinking areas (small, rural towns), creating a reliance on people with shrinking incomes (white workers without college degrees) to survive.

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With less than a week until the 2020 election, researchers have expressed concern that the information ecosystem today is ripe for an unprecedented level of exploitation by bad actors, particularly hyper-partisan media and personalities on the right.

Why it matters: The misinformation-powered right-wing media machine that fueled Donald Trump's 2016 victory grew stronger after that win, and it's set to increase its reach as a result of the upcoming election, whether Trump wins or loses.