Greg Ruben / Axios

We've introduced you to Stephen Miller as "the ideas guy and translator who is a true believer in the policies that delight Trump's base." The Charlotte Observer had a look at Miller during his time as a student at Duke that inspired a deeper dive into his college newspaper columns from 2006-2007. Some key quotes to help understand one of the president's key advisers:

  1. On putting together a 9/11 memorial event: "Anything that portrays America as under attack by Islamic terrorists, as even the most purely apolitical 9/11 memorial inevitably will, challenges the university dogma."
  2. To a classmate who called him a racist: "You're obsessed with race. You see everything in terms of race, and you see everyone who disagrees with your worldviews as a racist. And guess what? Almost everybody you've been talking to thinks something is wrong with you."
  3. On the dominance of American culture: "Continue to worship at the alter [sic] of multiculturalism and we may come to see that we are participating in the sacrifice of the one culture which binds us all."
  4. On religion in society: "No just society can survive which abandons God."
  5. On "unpatriotic dissent": "Every American has the right to support a policy of retreat and capitulation, and, as so many leftists do, they also have right to lie and slander the country and the president to further this agenda."
  6. On his perception of liberal bias in Duke's classes: "This isn't an education — it is a form of political advocacy and indoctrination, which is unprofessional and violates the tenets of academic freedom by which universities like Duke claim to be guided."
  7. On the Duke lacrosse scandal: "The last year offered a horrifying tutorial in the moral bankruptcy of the left's politically correct orthodoxy and the corruption of our culture at its hands."
  8. On Christmas political correctness: "It's the most wonderful time of year — but you wouldn't know it looking around Duke's campus. You'd probably find more Christmas decorations at your local mosque."
  9. On Hollywood's "culture war": "[T]he Hollywood crowd feels sympathy for the terrorists, detests Republicans and sees America as an obstacle to a better world."
  10. On his plan for "making Duke perfect": "Create a smoking lounge where all members of the Duke community can come to indulge in their favorite tobacco product. The room should have plenty of mahogany and leather, plasmas, darts, a grand piano and a professional full-service bar."

Read more about the president's inner circle: The Bannon coup

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