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Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

Facebook agreed in a preliminary settlement on Friday to pay $52 million in damages to current and former content moderators for mental health issues that were developed on the job, The Verge reports.

Why it matters: The settlement is an acknowledgement from the social network that content review systems take a toll on workers' mental health. The preliminary settlement filed in San Mateo Superior Court also said Facebook would provide more counseling for workers.

The big picture: Content moderators spend hours reviewing content containing violence, sexual acts and other disturbing material that poses violations to the website's community standards.

Between the lines: Facebook is already shifting much of its content moderation to AI, which may mean less trauma for its human moderators. AI now accounts for nearly 89% of Facebook’s content removal, the company disclosed Tuesday.

  • The tech company has further offloaded moderation of particularly troubling content to AI and in-house employees after sending its contractors home with pay as a result of the coronavirus pandemic.
  • However, Facebook also said Tuesday it will start allowing some of its human reviewers back in the office on a gradual basis.

The settlement covers 11,250 moderators.

  • Each moderator will receive a minimum of $1,000.
  • Others could be eligible for additional compensation if they are diagnosed with post-traumatic stress disorder or related conditions.
  • Lawyers in the case believe that "as many as half of them may be eligible for extra pay related to mental health issues associated with their time working for Facebook, including depression and addiction," per The Verge.

Go deeper: Facebook, Poynter and ATTN: partner on digital literacy project

Go deeper

Michigan to pay Flint water crisis victims $600 million

Michigan's City of Flint Water Plant illuminated by moonlight. Photo: Brett Carlsen/Getty Images

Michigan has agreed to pay $600 million to settle civil lawsuits brought over the deadly Flint water crisis, Gov. Gretchen Whitmer confirmed on Thursday.

Why it matters: Flint's drinking water was contaminated with high levels of lead in 2014 after the city changed its water source from treated Detroit Water and Sewerage Department water to the Flint River — causing a public health crisis.

Dion Rabouin, author of Markets
24 mins ago - Economy & Business

First glimpse of the Biden market

Photo: Jonathan Ernst-Pool/Getty Images

Investors made clear what companies they think will be winners and which will be losers in President Joe Biden's economy on Wednesday, selling out of gun makers, pot purveyors, private prison operators and payday lenders, and buying up gambling, gaming, beer stocks and Big Tech.

What happened: Private prison operator CoreCivic and private prison REIT Geo fell by 7.8% and 4.1%, respectively, while marijuana ETF MJ dropped 2% and payday lenders World Acceptance and EZCorp each fell by more than 1%.

Mike Allen, author of AM
56 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Biden-Harris, Day 1: What mattered most

President Joe Biden and first lady Dr. Jill Biden arrive at the North Portico of the White House. Photo: Alex Brandon-Pool/Getty Images

The Axios experts help you sort significance from symbolism. Here are the six Day 1 actions by President Biden that matter most.

Driving the news: Today, on his first full day, Biden translates his promise of a stronger federal response to the pandemic into action — starting with 10 executive orders and other directives, Caitlin Owens writes.