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Facebook's Mark Zuckerberg in 2016. Photo: Manu Fernadez/AP

Facebook has started laying out promised changes to its ad policies, spurred by concerns that Russians potentially used the company's platform to interfere with the 2016 election. The company said Monday that it would require political advertisers to provide more information. It will also add a thousand people to its team that reviews advertisements.

The bottom line: This is a first step. The most dramatic change Facebook has announced — making pages disclose all of the political ads they are running — remains abstract.

The details:

  • The company will add 1,000 employees to the team that reviews ads over the course of a year and adjust the factors it uses to evaluate ads.
  • Potential buyers of ads related to federal elections will have to affirm the organization that they represent.
  • The company will not allow even less overt references to violence in ads.
  • Facebook says it's building a new tool that will let you see the ads a page is running – including ads that aren't targeted to you directly.

The unanswered questions:

  • How will Facebook enforce creative guidelines? Facebook says it tries to catch all ads before they go live, but will still rely on user reports to flag bad ones. Premium publishers, like the New York Times, require that advocacy and political advertisers disclose what the ads look like upfront to a sales manager before they are allowed to run programmatically on the site, to avoid this risk.
  • What will the new ads review system look like? Facebook says it is hiring more people to enforce ads standards, but the standards being used to evaluate ads remains unclear. Other publishers will send advertisers these guidelines upfront, so as to ensure they don't submit ads that will be turned down — which slows down the ad-buying process.
  • How will it confirm advertiser legitimacy? Facebook says it's going to require more thorough documentation from advertisers who want to run US federal election-related ads, but what will this include?
  • When will the new transparency tool roll out? Advertising for the 2018 midterms is already underway.

Go deeper

Capitol Hill's far right pushes Anglo-Saxon values, European architecture

Photo: Al Drago/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Multiple far-right House Republicans have begun planning and promoting an America First Caucus aimed at pushing "uniquely Anglo-Saxon political traditions," Punchbowl News first reported.

The big picture: "The document was being circulated as the GOP is struggling to determine a clear direction as it prepares to try winning back control of the House and Senate in the 2022 elections," AP writes.

Super typhoon Surigae explodes to Cat. 5 intensity

Super Typhoon Surigae seen on satellite imagery Saturday morning east of the Philippines. (CIRA/RAMMB)

Super Typhoon Surigae surged in intensity from a Category 1 storm on Friday to a beastly Category 5 monster on Saturday, with maximum sustained winds estimated at 180 mph with higher gusts.

Why it matters: This storm — known as Typhoon Bising in the Philippines — is just the latest of many tropical cyclones to undergo a process known as rapid intensification, a feat that studies show is becoming more common due to climate change.