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Facebook VP Elliot Schrage, speaking at DLD 18 in Munich. (Photo: Ina Fried / Axios)

Facebook's top policy executive said Sunday that the company's move to let users decide which media is credible is a better option than Facebook itself deciding or turning it over to a panel of experts.

Why it matters: Facebook has been under fire for its role in the propagation of fake news and propaganda.

VP Elliot Schrage said that Facebook itself shouldn't be the one to decide which news to promote and said that, in a polarized world, turning things over to any third party simply “Invites criticism who that body of experts is.”

He promised that Facebook won't let people self-select into its survey of trusted media and that it will be statistically representative.

Responding to criticism, Schrage acknowledged that the company has spent too much in recent years on building new features and not enough in protecting the existing ones from abuse.

Schrage echoed CEO Mark Zuckerberg in saying that the company needs to do more when it comes to both removing hate speech and defending the service from being a tool for foreign interference in elections.

"We have not served that mission so well in either our explanations or our investments," VP Elliot Schrage said on Sunday, speaking at the DLD conference in Munich.

Specifically, Schrage pointed to three areas where the company is taking steps to do better.

  • preventing and quickly removing hate speech
  • preventing foreign interference in domestic affairs, especially elections
  • making sure that people who use the site find it to be "time well spent."

Go deeper

Bipartisan group of senators unveils $908 billion COVID stimulus proposal

Sens. Joe Manchin (D-W.Va.) and Susan Collins (R-Maine) in the Capitol in 2018. Photo: Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call

A bipartisan group of senators on Tuesday proposed a $908 billion coronavirus stimulus package, in one of the few concrete steps toward COVID relief made by Congress in several months.

Why it matters: Recent data shows that the economic recovery is floundering as coronavirus cases surge and hospitals threaten to be overwhelmed heading into what is likely to be a grim winter.

Inside Patch's new local newsletter platform

Illustration: Annelise Capossela/Axios

Patch, the hyperlocal (and profitable) local digital news company, has built a new software platform called "Patch Labs" that lets local news reporters publish their own newsletters and websites, sources tell Axios.

Why it matters: It follows a growing trend of journalists going solo via newsletters at the national level.

Scoop: Politico stars plot new Playbook

Anna Palmer and Jake Sherman. Photo: Alex Wong/Getty Images

Three of Politico’s biggest reporting stars plan to launch a competitor to the company’s Politico Playbook franchise, sources tell me. 

Why it matters:  Jake Sherman, Anna Palmer and John Bresnahan will launch a daily newsletter in 2021 as a stand-alone company, the sources say. In effect, they will be competing against the Playbook franchise they helped create and grow.