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Mark Zuckerberg. Photo: Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Facebook said in a blog post Tuesday that "roughly 100" software developers may have improperly accessed users' data, including the names and profile photos of people in specific groups on the social network.

Why it matters: Per Axios' chief technology correspondent Ina Fried, it's been clear for a while that the company’s issues with third parties go beyond Cambridge Analytica. This disclosure gives an indication of just how far.

Although we’ve seen no evidence of abuse, we will ask them to delete any member data they may have retained and we will conduct audits to confirm that it has been deleted."
— Facebook statement

The big picture: Cambridge Analytica, which worked for President Trump’s 2016 campaign, announced in May it had filed for bankruptcy and that it would close its operations following revelations that it misused Facebook data to build a system to predict and influence election choices.

  • Following the Cambridge Analytica scandal, Facebook "locked down the Groups application programming interface (API)," introduced rules requiring developers to obtain Facebook's consent before using the platform and included new security features in a July system relaunch, The Verge notes.
  • Facebook said it found in a review that "some apps retained access to group member information ... in connection with group activity, from the Groups API."

Go deeper: Facebook drowning in controversy ahead of mega-hearings

Go deeper

1 hour ago - Health

U.S. surpasses 25 million COVID cases

A mass COVID-19 vaccination site at Dodger Stadium on Jan. 22 in Los Angeles, California. Photo: Mario Tama/Getty Images

The U.S has confirmed more than 25 million coronavirus cases, per Johns Hopkins data updated on Sunday.

The big picture: President Biden has said he expects the country's death toll to exceed 500,000 people by next month, as the rate of deaths due to the virus continues to escalate.

GOP implosion: Trump threats, payback

Spotted last week on a work van in Evansville, Ind. Photo: Sam Owens/The Evansville Courier & Press via Reuters

The GOP is getting torn apart by a spreading revolt against party leaders for failing to stand up for former President Trump and punish his critics.

Why it matters: Republican leaders suffered a nightmarish two months in Washington. Outside the nation’s capital, it's even worse.

Erica Pandey, author of @Work
6 hours ago - Economy & Business

The limits of Biden's plan to cancel student debt

Data: New York Fed Consumer Credit Panel/Equifax; Chart: Axios Visuals

There’s a growing consensus among Americans who want President Biden to cancel student debt — but addressing the ballooning debt burden is much more complicated than it seems.

Why it matters: Student debt is stopping millions of Americans from buying homes, buying cars and starting families. And the crisis is rapidly getting worse.