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The deadliest tornadoes in U.S. history

A cone tornado
A 2017 tornado in Oklahoma. (Photo: Jason Weingart/Barcroft Images/Barcroft Media via Getty Images)

The single deadliest tornado to ever hit the United States, the "Tri-State Tornado," killed 695 people and injured 2,027 others in Southern Missouri, Illinois and Indiana in 1925. The tornado went on for 219 miles, making it the longest ever recorded.

Here are the 10 deadliest tornadoes to ever hit the U.S., per NOAA:

1. Tri-State Tornado — May 18, 1925

  • People killed: 695
  • People injured: 2,027
  • Rating: EF-5
  • States affected: Missouri, Illinois, Indiana

2. Great Natchez Tornado — May 6, 1840

  • People killed: 317
  • People injured: 109
  • States affected: Louisiana, Mississippi

3. Great St. Louis Tornado — May 27, 1896

  • People killed: 255
  • People injured: 1,000
  • Rating: EF-4
  • States affected: Missouri, Illinois

4. Tupelo-Gainesville tornado outbreak — April 5, 1936

  • People killed: 216
  • People injured: 700
  • Rating: EF-5
  • States affected: Mississippi

5. Tupelo-Gainesville tornado outbreak — April 6, 1936

  • People killed: 203
  • People injured: 1,600
  • Rating: EF-4
  • States affected: Georgia

6. The Woodward Tornado — April 9, 1947

  • People killed: 181
  • People injured: 970
  • Rating: EF-5
  • States affected: Texas, Kansas, Oklahoma

7. Joplin tornado — May 22, 2011

  • People killed: 158
  • People injured: 1,000
  • Rating: EF-5
  • States affected: Missouri

8. Dixie tornado outbreak — April 24, 1908

  • People killed: 143
  • People injured: 770
  • Rating: EF-4
  • States affected: Mississippi, Louisiana

9. New Richmond tornado — June 12, 1899

  • People killed: 117
  • People injured: 200
  • Rating: EF-5
  • States affected: Wisconsin

10. Flint-Beecher tornado — June 8, 1953

  • People killed: 116
  • People injured: 844
  • Rating: EF-5
  • States affected: Michigan

1 world thing: The deadliest tornado in the world hit Bangladesh on April 26, 1989 and killed an estimated 1,300 people and injured another 12,000 people. It left around 80,000 people homeless, per weather.com.

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