Screenshot of President Trump's tweet.

A narrow majority of Americans believe Twitter was right to flag one of President Trump's tweets as violating its rules on violence, according to a National Research Group survey being released later Monday.

Yes, but: As with nearly everything right now, there's a sharp partisan and ideological divide.

According to the survey:

  • 54% of Americans support Twitter's decision to add fact-checking labels to Trump's tweets.
  • Of the remainder, 26% thought Twitter was wrong, while 20% neither support nor oppose Twitter's move.
  • Self-described liberals were far more likely to support Twitter, with conservatives more likely to oppose the decision.

Among the other findings:

  • More than three in five Americans (including 42% of conservatives) said that potentially false statements by politicians are a bigger threat than potential censorship by social media companies.
  • Nearly three in four Americans (73%) are concerned that inaccurate information spread via social media could impact the 2020 election, though half of Americans are also concerned that actions taken by the social media companies could unfairly impact the election.
  • Only one-third of Americans support President Trump's decision to sign an executive order that aims to limit the power of social media companies to moderate content. Nearly half (48%) opposed it, while 18% said they neither support nor opposed the order.
  • Nearly half of those who took the survey said they think social media companies are not politically biased, while 38% said social media companies are generally biased in favor of liberals and 16% said the companies are biased in favor of conservatives.

Go deeper

The top Republicans who aren't voting for Trump in 2020

Photo: Brendan Smialowski/AFP via Getty Images

Vice President Pence's former lead staffer on the White House coronavirus task force announced that she plans to vote for Joe Biden in the 2020 election, while accusing President Trump of costing lives with his pandemic response.

Why it matters: Olivia Troye, who described herself as a life-long Republican, joins other prominent Republicans who have publicly said they will either not vote for Trump's re-election this November or will back Biden.

Sep 4, 2020 - Technology

Tech's ever-growing deepfake problem

Illustration: Annelise Capossela/Axios

The run-up to the U.S. presidential election is also speeding up the arrival of a tipping point for digital fakery in politics, Axios' Ashley Gold reports.

What's happening: As the election, a pandemic and a national protest movement collide with new media technology, this political moment is accelerating the proliferation and evolution of deliberately deceptive media, leaving companies struggling to enforce often-vague policies.

Russia likely to keep amplifying criticism of mail-in voting, DHS says

Acting DHS Secretary Chad Wolf testifies to the Senate Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Committee on August 6. Photo: Alex Wong/Pool/AFP via Getty Images

The Department of Homeland Security's intelligence branch warned law enforcement Thursday that it believes Russian-controlled social media trolls and state media are likely to continue trying to sow distrust in U.S. election results and mail-in ballots, ABC News first reported.

Why it matters: Americans are expected to vote by mail in record numbers in November's election due to the coronavirus pandemic, which means it may be days or weeks after election day before it's clear who won the presidency and down-ballot races.

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