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The European Council said Tuesday it has adopted a recommendation to allow a list of 14 countries to enter the EU's external borders beginning on July 1, but left off travelers from the U.S., Russia, Brazil and other countries that have failed to control the spread of the coronavirus.

Why it matters: It's an international rebuke of the Trump administration's handling of the pandemic. While the recommendations will be reviewed every two weeks, the guidelines suggest that U.S. residents won't be allowed to travel to the EU until the spread of the coronavirus is under control domestically.

  • The bloc will now allow travelers from Algeria, Australia, Canada, Georgia, Japan, Montenegro, Morocco, New Zealand, Rwanda, Serbia, South Korea, Thailand, Tunisia and Uruguay.
  • The EU will also lift travel restrictions for Chinese residents on July 1, on the condition that Beijing reciprocates the action.

Between the lines: The guidelines allow people from countries where the average number of infections per 100,000 inhabitants over the last two weeks is similar or below the EU's, and that have reported a declining case trend.

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