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Photo: Thierry Monasse via Getty Images

The European Parliament on Monday approved a law to limit the export of surveillance technologies that have the potential to be used to violate human rights.

Why it matters: Such products, which may also have legitimate uses, can be used to aid repressive regimes, criminal interests and domestic abusers.

Details: The new law applies to a range of technologies, including spyware and facial recognition technology, per MIT Technology Review.

  • The rules don't ban sales of the technology, but strengthen disclosure requirements, which proponents hope will lead to fewer abuses.
  • According to MIT Tech Review, "governments must either disclose the destination, items, value, and licensing decisions for cyber-surveillance exports or make public the decision not to disclose those details."

What they're saying: "Today is a win for human rights globally, and we set an important precedent for other democracies to follow suit," European Parliament member Markéta Gregorová said in a statement, per MIT Tech Review. "The world’s authoritarian regimes will not be able to secretly get their hands on European cyber-surveillance anymore."

Go deeper

Biden plans to ask public to wear masks for first 100 days in office

Joe Biden. Photo: Mark Makela/Gettu Images

President-elect Joe Biden told CNN on Thursday that he plans to ask the American public to wear face masks for the first 100 days of his presidency.

The big picture: Biden also stated he has asked NIAID director Anthony Fauci to stay on in his current role, serve as a chief medical adviser and be part of his COVID-19 response team when he takes office early next year.

What COVID-19 vaccine trials still need to do

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

COVID-19 vaccines are being developed at record speed, but some experts fear the accelerated regulatory process could interfere with ongoing research about the vaccines.

Why it matters: Even after the first COVID-19 vaccines are deployed, scientific questions will remain about how they are working and how to improve them.

2 hours ago - Podcasts

Faces of COVID creator on telling the stories of those we've lost

America yesterday lost 2,762 people to COVID-19, per the CDC, bringing the total pandemic toll to 272,525. That's more than the population of Des Moines, Iowa. Or Baton Rouge, Louisiana. Or Toledo, Ohio.

Axios Re:Cap speaks with Alex Goldstein, creator of the @FacesofCOVID Twitter account, about sharing the stories behind the statistics.