Jan 14, 2020

European leaders trigger dispute action in Iran deal

Boris Johnson, Angela Merkel and Emmanuel Macron in August. Photo: Andrew Parsons/Pool/Getty Images

The leaders of the U.K., Germany and France said in a Tuesday letter that they are triggering a "dispute mechanism" in the Iran nuclear agreement in response to Tehran’s attempts to undo parts of the deal, the AP reports.

Why it matters: The action could lead to the restoration of European sanctions on Iran that were rolled back in 2015.

What they're saying: The countries said they’ve been "left with no choice, given Iran’s actions, but to register today our concerns that Iran is not meeting its commitments."

  • German Foreign Minister Heiko Maas said the three European countries "could no longer leave the growing Iranian violations of the nuclear agreement unanswered. Our goal is clear: we want to preserve the accord and come to a diplomatic solution within the agreement."

Context: After the U.S. killed Iranian general Qasem Soleimani in an airstrike, Iran said that it would no longer respect limits in the agreement on how many centrifuges it can use to enrich uranium.

What's next: Under the deal, ministers now have two weeks to resolve disputes. The period can be extended if all sides agree.

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Iran's president says European soldiers in Middle East "could be in danger"

Iranian President Hassan Rouhani. Photo: Iranian Presidency/Handout/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images

Iran's president warned today that European soldiers in the Middle East "could be in danger" after three nations — Britain, France and Germany — challenged Tehran over breaking the limits of its nuclear deal, the AP reports.

Why it matters: President Hassan Rouhani's remarks in a televised Cabinet meeting represent the first direct threat he's made to Europe.

Go deeperArrowJan 15, 2020

Iran's proxies in the Middle East

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios. Photos: Behrouz Mehri/Getty Staff, Anadolu Agency/Getty Contributor, Kaveh Kazemi/Getty Contributor

Iran has built up a vast network of proxies through which it wields influence across the Middle East, and which could take action to stoke tensions between the U.S. and Iran over the killing of Gen. Qasem Soleimani.

Why it matters: The political parties and militias that are influenced by and act on behalf of Iran likely pose a more direct threat to U.S. targets than Iran itself, the Washington Post writes.

Go deeperArrowJan 18, 2020 - World

Iran's former crown prince rallies support for regime change

Inside Iran's Green Palace, with a painting of Reza Shah Pahlav. Photo: Atta Kenare/AFP via Getty Images

Iran's former crown prince entered the Hudson Institute, a conservative Washington think tank, to a standing ovation on Wednesday before calling on the U.S. to support the will of the Iranian people — to bring down their government.

Between the lines: Some might question Reza Pahlavi's status as a spokesperson for the Iranian people. He hasn't stepped foot in Iran since his father, the shah, fled the country in 1979.

Go deeperArrowJan 16, 2020