2020 presidential candidate Rep. Eric Swalwell explained on Fox News Sunday why — despite being one of the party's most vocal critics of President Trump — he has found himself among the Democratic lawmakers who have advised against immediately moving forward with impeachment.

"No one is going to question how hard I fought while our democracy has been on the line, but I also believe dearly in the rule of law. I was a prosecutor. I know when I go to court I've got to have my pencil sharpened, my subpoenas ready, my witnesses and exhibits ready to go. You only get one shot at this. I want to make sure we get it right. I think that means first getting the full Mueller report unredacted, getting Mueller to testify himself, getting people like Don McGahn in, and so we are pressing that and we are winning in the courts right now. The president is outnumbered with the subpoena power and the court rulings that are on our side. I think that's a road would go down, but we are not going to do Donald Trump justice here because we only get one shot to make sure the rule of law still stands in America.'

Why it matters: Swalwell's comments largely seem to reflect the thinking among Nancy Pelosi and top Democratic chairs in the House, who have sought to keep calls for impeachment at bay as their investigations proceed. Pressure to impeach is rising, but as Swalwell pointed out, a string of Democratic victories in court over the past few weeks suggests the tide could be turning against Trump's congressional stonewalling.

Go deeper: Trump's legal losing streak

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Democrats on Trump tax story: "This is a national security question"

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi said Monday that the New York Times report that President Trump has hundreds of millions of dollars in debt coming due within the next four years is a "national security question," and that the public has a "right to know" the details of his financial obligations.

The big picture: Democrats have already leapt on the Times' bombshell, which Trump has dismissed as "total fake news," to attack the president for allegedly paying less in federal income taxes than the average middle-class household.

Dan Primack, author of Pro Rata
Updated 2 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Unsealed opinion: Trump TikTok ban likely overstepped legal authority

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

A federal court judge on Sunday granted TikTok's request for a temporary restraining order against a ban by the Trump administration.

Driving the news: Judge Carl Nichols on Monday unsealed his opinion, in which he concluded that the ban seeks to regulate the exchange of "informational materials" — something that's expressly exempted from the law laying out the emergency powers Trump invoked.

Updated 3 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 12 p.m. ET: 33,156,812 — Total deaths: 998,696 — Total recoveries: 22,961,436Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 12 p.m. ET: 7,118,523 — Total deaths: 204,790 — Total recoveries: 2,766,280 — Total tests: 101,298,794Map.
  3. Business: Companies are still holding back earnings guidance.
  4. Health: The childless vaccine — Why kids get less severe coronavirus infections.
  5. World: India the second country after U.S. to hit 6 million cases