Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

Most people don't have nearly as much choice over their health insurance plans as Republicans and moderate Democrats sometimes suggest.

Between the lines: People who get their insurance from their employer — the majority of people with private insurance — are often given few plans to choose from, if they're given any choice at all.

What they're saying: This came up in former Vice President Joe Biden's interview with the New York Times' editorial board.

  • "If you like your plan, you can keep it, assuming — I should add the obvious — if your employer doesn’t take it away from you."

The comment is a nod to how much control employers have over their employees' health insurance.

  • Many workers are presented with just one plan option, meaning they don't have any choice at all. Others will have multiple plans, but all from the same insurance company.
  • Employers frequently shop around for better deals, but employees are stuck with choosing between the limited choices their employers present to them.
  • And while competition is improving in the individual market, most people who buy insurance on their own still have only a handful of insurers to choose from.

Biden has proposed a public insurance plan that would be open to people with employer-based insurance — which experts say could lead to some employers deciding not to offer their own coverage.

  • For workers who have generous employer coverage now, a public option with limited provider participation would probably be a bad deal.
  • But if most doctors and hospitals participate in the public option, workers may not end up with any fewer choices than they have now.

Between the lines: "In the current political debate, choice has mostly been about whether you can choose private insurance or a public Medicare-like plan. But, that in many ways obscures the choice that probably ultimately matters to most people, which is choice of doctor or hospital," the Kaiser Family Foundation's Larry Levitt said.

Go deeper: Employers aren't changing their health benefits

Go deeper

Updated 21 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Tim Scott says Trump "misspoke" when he told Proud Boys to "stand by"

Photo: Bonnie Cash/Pool/AFP via Getty Images

Sen. Tim Scott (R-S.C.) told reporters on Wednesday that he believes President Trump "misspoke" when he told the far-right "Proud Boys" group to "stand back and stand by" in response to a question about condemning white supremacy at the first presidential debate.

Catch up quick: Moderator Chris Wallace asked Trump on Tuesday, "Are you willing, tonight, to condemn white supremacists and militia groups and to say that they need to stand down?" Trump asked who specifically he should condemn, and then responded, "Proud Boys, stand back and stand by. But I'll tell you what, somebody's got to do something about antifa and the left."

Updated 29 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Commission on Presidential Debates wants changes

Photos: Jim Watson and Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images

The Commission on Presidential Debates announced Wednesday that it plans to implement changes to rules for the remaining debates, after Tuesday night's head-to-head between Joe Biden and Donald Trump was practically incoherent for most of the night.

What they are saying: "Last night's debate made clear that additional structure should be added to the format of the remaining debates to ensure a more orderly discussion of the issues," the CPD said in a statement.

Trump says he doesn't know who Proud Boys are after telling them to "stand by"

President Trump told reporters on Wednesday that he doesn't know who the Proud Boys are, after saying at the presidential debate last night that the far-right group should "stand back and stand by" in response to a question asking him to condemn white supremacists.

Why it matters: The comments set off outrage and calls for clarification from a number of Republican senators. After being asked several times on Wednesday whether he will condemn white supremacy, Trump responded, "I have always denounced any form — any form of any of that, you have to denounce. But I also — Joe Biden has to say something about antifa."

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