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Expand chart
Reproduced from a Kaiser Family Foundation report; Chart: Axios Visuals

The higher an employee's deductible is, the less they tend to think of their plan, according to a new Kaiser Family Foundation-Los Angeles Times survey of people with employer coverage.

Why it matters: Deductibles keep going up — suggesting more employees are probably growing dissatisfied with their employer health coverage.

  • The more people don't like their employer insurance, the less rattled they're likely to be if it's taken away — key context in the "Medicare for All" debate.

Between the lines: People with higher deductibles, unsurprisingly, reported having a harder time affording care.

By the numbers: 41% of survey respondents had an individual plan deductible higher than $1,500 or a family plan deductible above $3,000.

  • 40% of respondents reported some kind of affordability problem, the most common of which was paying for medical bills while still in their deductible.
  • People with higher deductibles were more likely to report an affordability problem.

What we're reading: The LA Times dug deeper into how insurance has changed over the last decade and what it means for workers.

  • "There has been a quiet revolution in what health insurance means in this country," the Kaiser Family Foundation's Drew Altman told the LA Times. "This happened under the radar while everyone was focused on the Affordable Care Act."

Go deeper: Why some families with insurance still can't afford health care

Go deeper

14 mins ago - Health

Moderna to file for FDA emergency use authorization for COVID-19 vaccine

Photo illustration by STR/NurPhoto via Getty Images

Moderna announced that it plans to file with the FDA Monday for an emergency use authorization for its coronavirus vaccine, which the company said has an efficacy rate of 94.1%.

Why it matters: Moderna will become the second company to file for a vaccine EUA after Pfizer did the same earlier this month, potentially paving the way for the U.S. to have two COVID-19 vaccines in distribution by the end of the year. The company said its vaccine has a 100% efficacy rate against severe COVID cases.

The social media addiction bubble

Illustration: Annelise Capossela/Axios

Right now, everyone from Senate leaders to the makers of Netflix's popular "Social Dilemma" is promoting the idea that Facebook is addictive.

Yes, but: Human beings have raised fears about the addictive nature of every new media technology since the 18th century brought us the novel, yet the species has always seemed to recover its balance once the initial infatuation wears off.

Young people's next big COVID test

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

Young, healthy people will be at the back of the line for coronavirus vaccines, and they'll have to maintain their sense of urgency as they wait their turn — otherwise, vaccinations won't be as effective in bringing the pandemic to a close.

The big picture: "It’s great young people are anticipating the vaccine," said Jewel Mullen, associate dean for health equity at the University of Texas. But the prospect of that enthusiasm waning is "a cause for concern," she said.