Feb 5, 2019

Wealthier people more likely to have employer insurance

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Data: Kaiser Family Foundation analysis of the National Health Interview Survey; Note: Excludes elderly population; Chart: Andrew Witherspoon/Axios

Low-income workers are significantly less likely to receive health insurance through their employer than wealthier people, according to the Kaiser Family Foundation. Only 28% of full-time workers below the federal poverty level have employer insurance.

Between the lines: Lower-income jobs are less likely to offer health benefits, and health care costs are also rising significantly faster than wages. "Employer health coverage is a part of compensation for workers, and low-wage workers just can’t command that level of compensation," Kaiser's Larry Levitt said.

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Go deeperArrowDec 27, 2019